Recipes

(Tetes de Violon a l'Ail (Garlic-flavoured Fiddleheads)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 pound Fiddleheads; fresh -OR-
1 package -frozen fiddleheads, 300 g
¼ cub Butter
6 Garlic cloves;finely chopped
2 Shallots; finely chopped
1 tablespoon Soya sauce
1 teaspoon Sugar, granulated
3 tablespoon White wine

Preparation:

Tetes de Violon a l'Ail

The tiny, curled fronds of fern, which have gained a reputation as one of Canada's national foods, come in a large part from the Matapedia River valley. At Auberge La Coulee Douce in Causapcal, Suzanne Couisneau likes to steam fiddleheads, then season then with garlic sauce.

Shake fresh fiddleheads in a paper bag until brown skins come off; discard skins. Steam fresh or frozen, unthawed, fiddleheads until just tender. Meanwhile, heat butter in heavy frying pan and saute garlic and shallots until softened. Blend in soya sauce, sugar and wine. Add steamed fiddleheads, turning to coat them well in sauce. Serve at once.
SERVES:4

Source: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

All Canadian Coffee

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

¼ cub Maple syrup; pure
½ cub Rye whiskey
3 cub Coffee; hot, black,double strength

TOPPING:
¾ cub Whipping cream
4 teaspoon Maple syrup; pure

Preparation:

Topping: Whip cream with maple syrup just up until soft mounds; set aside.
Divide maple syrup and whiskey among 4 warmed heatproof glass mugs or goblets. Pour in coffee to 1 inch of top; spoon topping over coffee.
Decorate with tiny Canadian flags if desired.

MAKES: 4 Servings
SOURCE: The Merry Christmas Cookbook from Canadian Living magazine

Apple Pancakes From The Townships

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 cub Flour; all purpose
1 tablespoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon Baking soda
2 teaspoon -Salt
3 tablespoon Sugar
1 teaspoon Cinnamon
2 ¼ cub Sour milk; buttermilk
2 Eggs
1 cub Apples;unpeeled,cut in pieces
6 tablespoon Butter; melted

Preparation:

Crepes aux pommes des Cantons

Sift together flour, baking powder (1 Tbsp amount is correct), baking soda, salt sugar and cinnamon.
Beat sour milk and eggs in a small bowl. Add apples, unpeeled and cut into small pieces and melted butter.
Add the sour milk mixture to the dry ingredients. Stir well. Cook as you would ordinary pancakes in greased cast iron fry pan. Brown on both sides.
Serve plain or with butter and maple syrup.

to quote Mme Benoit, " Each year at the end of September, the whole family would go to the Eastern Townships Apple Festival. And there, instead of eggs in syrup as was the custom at sugaring parties, apples pancakes were served with lots of butter and delicious Townships maple syrup."

Source: Mme. Jehane Benoit's _My Grandmother's Kitchen_ a collection of recipes from her grandmother's recipe book with modern measures and instructions added.

Apple Pork Chops

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

6 Pork chops
Pork chop fat or oil
2 teaspoon Buttersalt and pepper to taste
3 Apples-unpeeled with cores
1 teaspoon Sugar
Cinnamon

Preparation:

Cook the chops using melted fat trimmed from the meat and 1 tsp butter.
(Note those concerned about their fat intake may chose to use corn oil or some other vegetable oil rather than the pork fat). Season to taste and set on hot platter. Keep warm. Slice the apples ½" thick and add to the pan with 1 tsp butter, the sugar and a few pinches of cinnamon or cloves. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes, turning once or twice until some of apples are browned. Arrange them around the chops and serve. Serves: 4-6

To quote Mme. Benoit, "The apples keep the chops moist and tender. I sometimes use 6 to 7 apples, then I use 1 Tablespoon sugar. Serve very hot."
Source" _The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Baked Cod with Stuffing

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Cod, whole;head, fin, tail removed
Salt pork fat backsliced

STUFFING:
2 cub Bread crumbs; up to 3 cups
1 pinch -Salt
1 Onion; chopped
2 teaspoon Savoury
¼ cub Butter; up to ½ cupmelted
1 Potato; mashed
¼ cub Celery;finely chopped(optional)

Preparation:

Stuffing:
Mix all ingredients together well. Should be able to form into a ball.
Stuff into cod immediately before baking.

Remove bone from whole cod (head, tail and fins removed). Stuff interior of cod with savoury stuffing (see below). Bind cod with twine to hold in stuffing, and top generously with salt pork fat back. Bake cod with open side/salt pork up at 350 Degrees F for one hour or until salt pork is brown and crunchy.
That's about it, you could sub in bacon for the salt pork, but it is good with the salt pork. Enjoy.

To: WAYNE WOODMAN Refer#: NONE Conf: F-COOKING (1010) Read Type: TEXT SCAN (+)

Baked Peameal Bacon

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Peameal Bacon, 1 centre cutpiece

Preparation:

"Peameal bacon is a unique Canadian meat, pickled but unsmoked loin of pork rolled in cornmeal. Usually it is sliced and fried for breakfast but it excellent baked whole. The cornmeal makes a crisp exterior and the meat, although quite lean, is particularly juicy, because of the pickling process. For baking it is important to select a piece from the centre cut, with a wide band of lean visible on both ends."

Place in an open roasting pan, fat side up. Bake at 350F degrees for 1- ½ hours. Serve hot in generous slices with baked beans if desired.

SOURCE: _Classic Canadian Cooking_ by Elizabeth Baird

Bannock

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

1 cub Whole wheat flour
½ cub All purpose flour
½ cub Rolled oats
2 tablespoon Sugar, granulated
2 teaspoon Baking powder
½ teaspoon -Salt
2 tablespoon Butter, melted
1/3 cub Raisins; optional
¾ cub -Water; approx,

Preparation:

"Bannock, a simple type of scone was cooked in pioneer days over open fires. Variations in flours and the additional of dried or fresh fruit make this bread the simple choice of Canadian campers even today. Oven baking has become an acceptable alternative to the cast iron frypan. McKelvie's restaurant in Halifax serves an oatmeal version similar to this one. For plain bannock, omit rolled oats and increase the all purpose flour to 1 cup....
One of the earliest quick breads, bannock was as simple as flour, salt, a bit of fat (often bacon grease) and water. In gold rush days, dough was mixed right in the prospector's flour bag and cooked in a frypan over an open fire.
Indians wrapped a similar dough around sticks driven into the ground beside their camp fire, baking it along with freshly caught fish. Today's native _Fried Bread_ is like bannock and cooked in a skillet.
Newfoundlander's _Damper Dogs_ are small rounds of dough cooked on the stove's dampers while _Toutons_ are similar bits of dough deep fried. At a promotional luncheon for the 1992 Inuit Circumpolar Conference, Eskimo Doughnuts, deep fried rings of bannock dough, were served. It is said that Inuit children prefer these "doughnuts" to sweet cookies.
Red River settlers from Scotland made a frugal bannock with lots of flour, little sugar and drippings or lard. Now this same bread plays a prominent part in Winnipeg's own Folklorama Festival.
At Expo '86 in Vancouver, buffalo on bannock buns was a popular item at the North West Territories ' restaurant. In many regions of Canada, whole wheat flour or wheat germ replaces part of the flour and cranberries or blueberries are sometimes added. A Saskatchewan firm markets a bannock mix, and recipe books from coast to coast upgrade bannock with butter, oatmeal, raisins, cornmeal and dried fruit."

Stir together flours, oats, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add melted butter, raisins (if using) and water, adding more water if needed to make sticky dough. With floured hands, pat into greased pie plate. Bake in 400F oven for 20 to 25 minutes or until browned and tester comes out clean. Cut into wedges.
SERVES:6
VARIATIONS: In place of raisins add chopped dried apricots or fresh berries.(Blueberries are terrific if one is camping in northern Ontario in August.)

SOURCE: "The First Decade" chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Beignes Aux Dattes De Ma Mere (mother's Date Doughnuts)

Servings: 3

Ingredients:

2 Eggs, beaten
¾ cub Granulated sugar
1 tablespoon Melted butter
2 ½ cub All-purpose flour
2 ½ teaspoon Baking powder
½ teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Ground nutmeg
1 cub Dates, chopped
1 cub Milk
1 teaspoon Lemon extract

Preparation:

Servings: 3 to 4 dozen doughnuts

Vegetable oil or shortening for deep-frying

In a bowl, combine beaten eggs, sugar and melted butter; beat well. In another bowl, combine flour with baking powder, salt and nutmeg. Fold in dates. Add dry ingredients to egg mixture alternately with milk and lemon extract.

Heat oil in deep-fat fryer to 375 deg F. Drop batter by tablespoonfuls, 2 or 3 at a time, into hot oil and fry until crisp and brown, about 3 minutes frying time, turning once. Drain on paper towels.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by Linda Davis

Boudin du pays (Blood Pudding)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub Pork bloodSalt
2 pound Pork, fresh
1 Pig's lung
½ Pig's heart
2 Pig necksSalt
5 Onions; choppedSalt & pepper
Cloves
Summer Savory
Coriander seeds; crashedto taste
2 tablespoon Flour

Preparation:

"Blood pudding is one of the great delicacies of Acadian cuisine. It used to be that every Acadian family made its own. Since the annual slaughter came during Advent, the boudin was usually saved for the Christmas holidays." Also part of Cajun cuisine,

Sauce a boudin
When slaughtering a pig, collect the fresh blood, immediately add salt and stir to prevent coagulation.
Cut the fresh pork, the lung, heart and neck into large pieces. Place the meat into a large pot and add just water to cover the meat. Add the salt and 3 chopped onions. Simmer on medium heat for 3 hours.
Remove the meat from the cooking liquid and let it cool. Cut the meat into very small pieces or grind it with a meat grinder. Add the meat to the cooking liquid with the 2 remaining onions, pepper and spices.
Bring the liquid to a boil and slowly add the blood by pouring it through a sieve. Stir constantly. Add the flour, mixed with a small amounts of water. (The flour may be browned in the oven before being add to the meat, provided that slightly more flour is used.) Simmer the mixture on low heat for approximately 1 hour, stirring frequently.
This sauce may served later by warming in a skillet.

Boudin des Branches (Blood Pudding Sausages)
To make blood pudding sausages, prepare blood pudding sauce but do not simmer for the last half hour. Rather, clean the small intestines of the pig, cut them into 20 inch pieces at tie them at one end.
Using a funnel or a piece of birch bark as was the Acadian tradition, fill the intestinal lining with the sauce until the intestine is three quarters full. press out the air and tie the other end, leaving some space for expansion.
Put the branches (sausages) in boiling water and cook for 45 to 1 hour.

SOURCE:_A Taste of Acadie_ by Marielle Cormier-Boudreau

Butter Tart Pie

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 Eggs
¾ cub Brown sugar; packed
¾ cub Corn syrup
3 tablespoon Butter; melted
4 teaspoon Flour; all purpose
1 ½ teaspoon Vanilla
¼ teaspoon -salt
2 ¼ cub Currants or raisins
1 Pie shell, 9", unbaked

Preparation:

In bowl, beat eggs lightly. Stir in brown sugar, corn syrup, butter, flour, vanilla and salt until blended. Stir in currants or raisins. Pour in pie shell.
Bake in 400F for 5 minutes. Remove heat to 250F. Bake for about 30 minutes longer or till centre is just firm to the touch, covering edges of pastry with foil if browning too much. Let cool completely before cutting.
MAKES:10 Serving

This version of butter tarts (a Canadian speciality) is easier to prepare than the traditional individual tarts. It is very rich and best served in small pieces.
Canadian Living magazine

Butter Tarts

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

¼ cub Butter
½ cub Brown sugar; packed
½ teaspoon Vanilla
1 Egg
½ cub Corn syrup
½ cub Raisins; or currants
12 Tart shells;lined withpastry shells

Preparation:

"These tarts were the basis for Butter Tart Pie and Butter Tart Squares which appeared in later decades. Another variation uses maple syrup instead of corn syrup. ...Butter Tarts are uniquely Canadian. There are theories whether they were adapted from southern pecan pie, old-fashioned sugar pies, or maple syrup, backwoods or vinegar pies. Squabbles arise whether or not the tarts should be runny or not, and just how runny.
Opinions differ about the use of syrup or sugar only, eggs beaten or not, currants or raisins, and how the tart pans should be filled."

In bowl, cream together butter, sugar and vanilla. Beat in egg and corn syrup. Spoon raisins into tart shells; pour in the filling, two-thirds full. Bake in 375F oven for 15 to 18 minutes or until lightly browned.
MAKES: 12 TARTS

SOURCE: The 1st decade chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_ by Carol Ferguson and Marg Fraser

Cape Breton Oatcakes

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub Flour;all purpose
2 cub Rolled oats
1 cub Brown sugar;packed
2 teaspoon Baking powder
½ teaspoon -Salt
1 cub Shortening
½ cub -Cold water

SAVORY VARIATION:
2 cub Oatmeal; scotch type*
1 cub Flour;all purpose
2 teaspoon Sugar, granulated
2 teaspoon Baking powder
¼ teaspoon -Salt
1/3 cub Shortening; or lard orbacon fat
¼ cub -Cold water

Preparation:

Anne's note: I prefer the savory version as it is closer to the original Scottish version ; my grandmother in Nova Scotia uses 'pinhead' oatmeal, a fine grind of oatmeal sold in the Maritimes, "Ogilivy's" is the most popular brand there. Processing the oats in a food processor for a few seconds should help.

"If desired process the oats in a food processor for 10 seconds to get a finer texture...The original recipe for oatcakes likely arrived with Scottish settlers in Nova Scotia. Fine oatmeal ground in the pioneer's gristmills, a little fat worked with fingertips, and perhaps a touch of sugar, made a crispy baked "cake" to eat with cheese or jam. Over the years, Cape Bretoners (and eventually all cooks across Canada) used rolled oats and more sugar to make a cookie-like oatcake. The Glenghorm Resort in Angonish, Nova Scotia, prints a recipe for these regional favorites on its postcards. Trilibys, a British version, richer and filled with a cooked date mixture, lead to the Date Sandwich Cookies so popular in Canada over the years."

Sweet version: Stir together flour, oats, sugar, baking powder and salt; rub in shortening with fingertips. Mix in water with fork, until ball forms; divide in half.
On a floured surface, roll out each half to ¼ inch (5 mm) thickness.
Cut into 2 ½ inch (6 squares), then into triangles. Bake on lightly greased baking sheets in 350F oven for 15 minutes or till lightly browned.
Transfer to racks to cool.
MAKES: 60

Savory Variation: (to serve with cheese)
Mix 2 cups Scotch-type oatmeal, 1 cup all-purpose flour, 2 tsp each granulated sugar and baking powder, and ¼ tsp salt. Work in 1/3 cup shortening, lard or bacon fat. Add ¼ cup cold water. Proceed as above.

SOURCE: The 1st decade chapter of _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Cape Breton 'pork Pies'

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

TART SHELLS:
1 cub Butter
4 teaspoon Icing sugar; confectioner's
2 cub Flour

FILLING:
2 cub Dates; chopped
1 ½ cub Brown sugar
1 cub -Water
Lemon juice

Preparation:

"How these little tarts got their name remains a mystery to us. It could be that pork fat was once used as the shortening or it just might be a reflection of the wonderful Cape Breton sense of humor."

Tart Shells:
Cut the butter into the flour; add the flour and knead until well blended.
Press small amounts of dough into small muffin tins. Press small amounts of dough into small muffin tins. Bake in a 425F oven for 10 minutes. When cool fill with the following:

Filling:
Simmer the above ingredients until the dates are of soft consistency.
Cool; then fill the tart shells. Ice with butter icing.

Source: _Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens_

Cape Breton Scones

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub Flour
2 tablespoon Sugar
1 tablespoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon -salt
¼ teaspoon Baking soda
1 cub Raisins or currants
½ cub Sour cream
¼ cub Oil
1 Egg;slightly beaten
3 tablespoon Milk

Preparation:

Sift together dry ingredients and stir in the raisins. Blend the remaining ingredients and stir in the flour mixture until the dough is all together.
Toss on a lightly floured surface until no longer sticky. Knead a few times. Divide the dough in half then pat each ball of dough into a 6 " circle with the top slightly rounded. Brush the tops with milk and sprinkle with sugar. Cut each circle into 6 wedges. Place 2 inches apart on a cookie sheet. Bake at 425F for 10 to 12 minutes or till golden. Serve hot with butter and jam or flavoured butter or honey.

Source: _More Baking with Schmecks Appeal_

Cauliflower Souffle

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Cauliflower;medium, cut inflorets
2 tablespoon Butter
2 tablespoon Flour;all purpose
1 cub MilkSalt & pepper
Nutmeg, ground
4 Eggs; separated
1 cub Cheddar cheese;strong,grated

Preparation:

Souffle de Chou-Fleur
The fertile plains around Lac St. Jean produces excellent vegetables and supports thriving dairy farms. A strong cheddar cheese, made at St. Prime on the west side of the lake and aged up to 4 years, is one of the region's finest cheeses. Adele Coperman-Langevin of St. Fulhence combines cauliflower from her market garden in her souffle.

Cook cauliflower in boiling, salted water until tender, drain well and mash. Melt butter in medium saucepan, blend in flour and cook, stirring over medium heat until bubbly; do not let mixture brown.
Meanwhile, bring milk to a boil in another saucepan. Add hot milk to butter-flour mixture and cook, stirring over medium heat until sauce thickens and is smooth. Season to taste with salt, pepper and nutmeg.
Remove from heat.
Lightly beat egg yolks and stir into sauce. Then stir in cheese and cauliflower until smooth. In a large bowl, beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Fold cauliflower mixture gently but thoroughly into beaten egg whites. Pour into a buttered 2 quart (2 L) souffle dish. Bake in preheated 350F oven for 30 to 40 minutes, or till puffed, firm and lightly browned.
Serve at once.
SERVES: 4-6

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_by Julian Armstrong

Cherry Almond Nanaimo Bars

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

BASE:
½ cub Butter
¼ cub Sugar
1/3 cub Cocoa
1 teaspoon Vanilla
1 Egg; beaten
1 cub Coconut, desiccated
1 ¾ cub Graham wafer crumbs
½ cub Almonds; chopped

FILLING:
¼ cub Butter; softened
1 tablespoon Cherry juice
2 cub Icing sugar
1/3 cub Maraschino cherries; chopped

TOP:
2 ounce Semisweet chocolate
1 tablespoon Butter

Preparation:

BASE: Cook butter, sugar, cocoa, vanilla & egg in saucepan over low heat heat, stirring constantly until custard begins to thicken. Remove from heat and stir in coconut, crumbs and almonds. Pat firmly into a greased 9 pan inch square pan. Chill for 1 hour.

FILLING: Cream butter, cherry juice and extract. Gradually beat in icing sugar to a make a smooth spreading consistency. Stir in cherries. Spread over base and chill until firm.

TOP: Heat chocolate and butter, stirring until smoothly melted. Drizzle chocolate over filling. Chill. Cut into bars.
YIELD: 30 BARS

SOURCE: _Tastefully Yours_, All Saint Kingsway Anglican Church, Toronto

Christmas Oyster Soup (soupe Aux Huitres De Noel)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 Carrots; mediumpeeled & grated in long,thin shreds
½ cub Celery; finely diced
¼ cub Butter; melted
4 cub Milk; or ½ milk, ½ cream
4 cub Oysterssalt and pepper to taste

Preparation:

Peel and grate in long thin shreds, the carrots and add finely diced celery. Melt butter in saucepan and add the vegetables. Stir. Cover and simmer over very low heat for 20 minutes, without browning the vegetables.
Add milk (or use ½ milk, ½ cream); bring to a boil.
Heat oysters in enamelled cast iron pan over medium heat; do not boil.
Pour into milk and serve. Use salt and pepper to taste.

The soup should be served as soon as ready, otherwise it tend to curdle.
The milk and vegetables can be be prepared ahead of time and the oysters heated and served at the last minute.

To quote Mme. Benoit,"This traditional Quebec dish is still very much alive. My grandmother's recipe is, as far as I am concerned, the best there is."
Note: from Anne - it seems as oysters were used at Christmas. My maternal grandmother from the American midwest had a similar Christmas oyster dish although hers included corn.

Source: _My Grandmother's Kitchen" by Mme. Benoit

Cipaille Or Cipate (layered Meat Pie)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

2 pound Boneless chicken meat
2 pound Lean beef
2 pound Lean pork
4 medium Onions, coarsely chopped
¼ pound Salt pork, thinly sliced
2 cub Potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 teaspoon Salt
½ teaspoon Ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon Mixed ground cloves, nutmeg,cinnamon, allspice
2 cub Chicken stock (approximate)

Preparation:

Traditionally this layered pie is best made with game. Failing a supply of venison or pheasant it can be made with a mixture of meats and poultry as is this recipe.

Servings: 8 to 10

Pastry for double crust pie
Cut chicken, beef and pork into 1 inch cubes and place in a large bowl.
Combine with onions; cover and refrigerate for at least 12 hours or overnight.

Arrange salt pork evenly in the bottom of a 3 quart casserole, preferably cast iron with a cover. Layer with 1/3 of the meat mixture and 1/3 of the potatoes; season with 1/3 of salt, pepper and spices. Roll out half of the pastry slightly thicker than for a normal pie and arrange on the potato layer, cutting a small hole in the centre. Repeat with 2 more layers of meat and potatoes seasoned with salt, pepper and spices. Cover with remaining pastry, cutting a small hole in the centre.

Slowly add enough chicken stock through the hole until liquid appears.
Cover dish and bake in a preheated 400 deg F oven for 45 minutes or until liquid simmers. Reduce temperature to 250 deg F and continue to bake, covered, for 5 to 6 hours more or until top crust is a rich golden brown.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by: Linda Davis

Cipate au Salmon (Layered Salmon Pie)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

¼ pound Salt pork
1 pound Salmon streak;or filletsskinned & cut into pieces
2 tablespoon Flour;all purpose
¼ cub Celery;chopped
1 tablespoon Onion;finely chopped
1 Potato; medium, peeled &slicedSalt & ground white pepper
Pastry for double crust 9"pie

Preparation:

Cipate au Salmon

"This traditional salmon dish comes from Auberge La Msrtre, an inn on the north coast near St. Anne des Monts. Proprietors Roger Fournier and Marie France Crevier specialize in fish and game dishes."

Cut salt pork into thick strips and spread evenly in the bottom of a 2 qt casserole. Dredge salmon lightly with flour. Arrange half the fish on the salt pork. Sprinkle with half of the celery, onion and potato slices; season with salt and pepper to taste.
Roll out half of the pastry, slightly thicker than normal, to fit the size of the casserole. Cover potato layer with the pastry, cutting two large vents. Pour in water through the vents until level with the pastry.
Layer with the remaining fish, celery, onion and potato to taste. Cover with top pastry crust and again cut out two vents. Pour water in vents until level with pastry.
Bake pie in a preheated 350F oven for 1 ½ hours or till crust is golden-brown.
SERVES:4-6

Source:_ A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Crab Custard With Lemon Butter Sauce

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Brocolli;bunch, mediumcut into small florets
½ pound Crab meat;fresh or frozentrimmed of cartilege
3 Eggs
¾ cub Whipping cream
¾ cub Milksalt & ground white pepper
1 pinch Nutmeg, ground

LEMON BUTTER SAUCE:
½ cub White wine
1 Shallot, dry;finely chopped
1 cub Butter; cut in pieces
¼ cub Whipping cream
1 Lemon;juice of

Preparation:

In this recipe Quebec snow crab is combined with brocolli, oven-poached and served on a sauce, nouveau cuisine fashion. This appetizer is the creation of Chef Denis Pelletier of Moulin de St. Laurent, a contemporary French restaurant located in an old stone mill in the village of St.
Laurent on Ile d'Orleans. Ramekins can be filled ahead and oven poached at the last minute, or you can reheat the cooked flan in a microwave oven for about 2 minutes at Medium (50 percent).

Cook brocolli florets in boiling salted water just until tender-crisp; drain. Generously brush 6 to 8 ramekin or custard cups with melted butter.
Divide crab meat with brocolli among the ramekins. In a bowl, whisk together the eggs, cream and milk; season with salt, pepper and nutmeg.
Fill ramekins three-quarters full with the custard and set in a shallow pan of hot water. Oven poach for 1 hour at 325F or until set. (A knife inserted in centre should come out clean.)
Make Lemon Butter Sauce and pour onto 6 to 8 serving plates. Run a knife around the edge of each ramekin and unmold onto sauce.

Lemon Butter Sauce:
In small saucepan, heat wine and chopped shallot. Bring to a boil and reduce over medium-high heat until only 2 tablespoons of liquid remain.
Reduce heat to low and whisk in butter, a few pieces at a time, until sauce is smooth and all the butter is incorporated. Whisk in cream and lemon juice. Keep warm in the top of a double boiler set over hot water until serving time.
MAKES: about 1 ½ CUPS SAUCE

SERVES: 6-8 as an appetizer

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Crepes a la Neige (Crepes with Snow)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub Flour
1 ¼ cub Milk
1 cub Snow, fresh, hard packed
½ teaspoon -Salt
1 cub Oil

Preparation:

"Throughout Acadia, it was customary to make crepes at Candlemas and objects such as medals, wedding rings, buttons or pennies were hidden inside and often used to predict the future of those who found them.
Moreover, since eggs were often scarce this time of year as a substitute with spectacular results. Hence some Acadians still describe a snowfall as "being enough to make crepes with." This recipe is always called Crepes a la neige, even when eggs are used instead of snow."

Mix all the ingredients together to make a smooth dough. Drop a spoonful of the batter into 1 inch of hot fat. Fry for 2-3 minutes on each side.
Serve with molasses or grated maple sugar.

SOURCE:"A Taste of Acadie" by Marielle Cormier Boudreau

Fish And Brewis

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 pound Salt cod
2 Hardbread or hardtack cakes
1 cub Salt pork; diced

Preparation:

"Fish and brewis (pronounced "brews") is one of the oldest traditional dishes of Newfoundland. ... The fish in Fish and Brewis is salt cod and the brewis is made from hardtack or hardbread, which is available everywhere in Newfoundland and in specialized grocery stores across Canada. The dish is always sprinkled with scrunchions, crisp fried bits of salt pork. Fisherman's Brewis is sometimes the same as Fish and Brewis, but often the fish and bread are chopped while hot and mixed together, or fresh cod is used instead of salt cod."

Cut cod into serving-size pieces. Soak cod and hardbread separately in cold water for 8 hours or overnight. Drain fish. In saucepan, cover fish with cold water. Heat to boiling and boil gently for 15 to 20 minutes or until tender; drain.
Meanwhile, in skillet, fry salt pork until golden. Brain bread and place in saucepan, cover with salted water and bring to a full boil. Drain immediately and serve with fish on warm plates. Sprinkle with scrunchions.
SERVES:4

SOURCE: The Thirties chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Flapper Pie

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 ¼ cub Graham wafer crumbs
¼ cub Sugar, granulated
½ teaspoon Cinnamon
¼ cub Butter;melted

FILLING:
¼ cub Sugar, granulated
3 tablespoon Cornstarch
2 cub Milk
2 Egg yolks;lightly beaten
1 teaspoon Vanilla

MERINGUE:
2 Egg whites
¼ teaspoon Cream of tartar
2 tablespoon Sugar, granulated

Preparation:

"In eastern Canada, this recipe was called Graham Wafer Cream Pie, but westerners knew it as Flapper Pie. ... Cream pies like butterscotch, banana, cream and coconut cream were favorites of this decade and restaurants (called cafes in the West and usually run by Chinese cook/owners) always had cream pies on their menus.

Combine crumbs, sugar and cinnamon; blend in butter. Set ¼ c aside.
Press remainder onto bottom and sides of 9 inch pie plate. Bake in 375F oven for 8 minutes; cool.
Filling: In saucepan, mix sugar with cornstarch; blend in milk. Cook over medium heat, stirring, until boiling; stir a little into yolks, then retUrn to the saucepan. Cook over low heat, stirring, for 2 minutes or until thickened. Remove from heat; add vanilla and cool slightly. Pour into pie crust.
Meringue: Beat egg whites with cream of tartar till soft peaks form; gradually beat in sugar until stiff peaks form. Spread over filling, sealing to crust. Top with reserved crumbs. Bake in 400F oven for 5 minutes or till lightly browned. Cool to room temperature, about 4 hours.

SOURCE: The Twenties chapter, _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Fred's Hottest Shrimp ****

Servings: 1 servings

Ingredients:

1 pound Medium Shrimp, Shelled And Deveined, Shells Reserved
½ cub Water
2 teaspoon Tabasco Pepper Sauce
1 tablespoon Catsup
1 teaspoon Salt
1 ½ teaspoon Sugar
pinch White Pepper
4 tablespoon Olive Oil
1 small Green Pepper, Cut Into ½-Inch Cubes
1 small Red Pepper, Cut Into ½-Inch Cubes
4 Minced Garlic Cloves
½ cub Diced Onion
1 tablespoon White Wine

Preparation:

Fred Ferretti, who writes a regular column in Gourmet magazine, is rumored to carry a flask of Tabasco sauce on his hip. He insists this is an exaggeration, but he has been known to shake droplets of the pepper sauce even on dim sum. Here's his recipe for shrimp with a real kick.
~--------------------------------------------------------------------- ~-- In a small saucepan, combine the shrimp shells with the water and boil for 10 minutes. Remove the shells and reserve the stock. In a small bowl, combine 1 tablespoon of the shrimp stock with the Tabasco sauce, catsup, salt and sugar; set aside. Heat 1-½ tablespoons of oil, add the bell peppers and saute for 1 minute, then remove the peppers and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and add the remaining 2-½ tablespoons oil and the garlic and onion. Cook over high heat for about 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent.
Stir in the shrimp and cook for 1 minute. Add the wine and mix well.
The shrimp should begin to curl. Add the reserved peppers and stir, cooking for about 30 seconds. Stir the Tabasco sauce mixture and pour it into the skillet, mixing all ingredients thoroughly. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer the shrimp with the sauce to a warmed serving dish. Serve immediately with cooked rice.

From: The Tabasco Cookbook.

French Canadian Pea Soup

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 pound Dried peas
8 cub -Water
½ pound Salt pork-all in one piece
1 Onion, large;chopped
½ cub Celery;chopped
¼ cub Carrots;grated
¼ cub Parsley; fresh,chopped
1 Bay leaf;small
1 teaspoon Savory, driedSalt and Pepper

Preparation:

"Newfoundland Pea Soup is very similar, but usually includes more vegetables such as diced turnips and carrots, and is often topped with small dumplings. This soup is very good reheated..
The most authentic version of Quebec's soupe aux pois use whole yellow peas, with salt pork and herbs for flavour. After cooking, the pork is usually chopped and returned to the soup, or sometimes removed to slice thinly and served separately. Instead of fresh or dried herbs, herbes salees (herbs preserved with salt) are often used; they are available commercially or made at home.
Pea soup remains a popular dish in restaurants where tourists enjoy a true taste of old Quebec. In some variations, a little garlic, leeks, other vegetables or a ham bone are added for flavour. For a thicker consistency (though this is not traditional) a cup or two of cooked peas can be pureed then returned to the soup."

Wash and sort peas; soak in cold water overnight. Drain and place in a large pot; add water, parsley, salt pork, onion, celery, carrots, parsley, bay leaf, savory and 1 tsp salt. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until peas are very tender, about 2 hours, adding more water if needed.
Remove salt pork; chop and return to soup. Discard bay leaf. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

MAKES 8 SERVINGS:
SOURCE: "The First Decade" chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_ by Carol Ferguson and Margaret Fraser

Fricot A La "Belette" ("Weasel" Fricot/Soup)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Onion; chopped
3 tablespoon Butter
2 tablespoon Salted herbs;*
4 cub -Water
3 cub Potatoes; dicedsalt and pepper
1 tablespoon Flour

DUMPLINGS:* THIS IS ONE OF:
several possible dumplingrecipes given
1 cub Flour
½ teaspoon -Salt
½ cub -Cold water

Preparation:

"If there was one dish that could be called typically Acadian, it would certainly be Fricot, a soup containing potatoes and meat. The dish has been a long time favorite in Acadian households, so much that the word fricot was once synomous with a good meal and a common call for dinner was often, "Vous etes invites au fricot!"... This potato fricot was prepared when neither meat nor fish were available, and given the tongue-in-cheek name, "Weasel Fricot" (Fricot a la Belette). If you ask Acadians about the origin of the name, they will smile and say, "Parce que b'lette a passe tout drouete (Because the weasel went right on by.)

On Prince Edward it is called Fricot a la bezette (Ninicompoop Fricot) where bezette roughly translates as "nincompoop". It is known as butter fricot, salted her fricot and potato fricot, and is often served with a large slice of buttered bread and molasses."

Handkerchief Dumplings (Pates en Mouchior de Poche) Mix flour with salt. Gradually add cold water to the dough as one would when making biscuits.
Roll the dough fairly thin, cut into 1 ½ inch squares and place the squares in the fricot. Cover and simmer 7 minutes.

Saute the onion and salted herbs in butter for 1-2 minutes or until the onion is golden brown. Add the water, potatoes, salt and pepper, and simmer for 20 minutes. To thicken the broth, add dumpling or flour mixed with water.

SOURCE: _A Taste of Acadie_ by Marie Cormier-Boudreau

Gateaux Jos Louis (Joe Louis Cakes)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

CAKE:
½ cub Butter
½ cub Sugar, granulated
2 Eggs;beaten
1 cub Milk
1 tablespoon White vinegar
1 teaspoon Baking soda
2 cub Flour;all purpose
1 teaspoon Baking powder
¼ cub Cocoa powder;unsweetened
½ teaspoon -Salt
1 ½ teaspoon Vanilla

VANILLA FILLING:
2 Egg whites
½ cub Sugar, granulated
1 pinch -Salt
2 tablespoon -Water
1 teaspoon Vanilla

CHOCOLATE ICING:
2 tablespoon Butter
2 tablespoon Cocoa powder;unsweetened
2 tablespoon Light cream; up to 3 T
½ teaspoon Vanilla
½ cub Icing (Confectioner's) sugarapproximate

Preparation:

Gateaux Jos. Louis

Home-made versions of this best selling commercial snacking cake turn up in recipe collections throughout the Beauce. A product of the giant Vachon bakery at St. Marie, it was launched by founder-bakers Arcade and Rose-Anna Vachon who named it for their eldest two sons Joseph and Louis and not, as some believe , after the heavyweight boxing champion, Joe Louis. Home recipes use a drop-cookie method and -sometimes- a marshmallow filling. The baking cake is made automatically with a diameter of 3 ½ inches (9 cm). To achieve a symmetrical look and a light texture, I adapted a recipe belonging to Mariette Scully Bourque of Notre Dame des Pins to the muffin tin.

CAKE: Grease 12 medium muffin tins or 24 small ones. In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar together until fluffy. Measure milk into a 1 cup measure and stir in vinegar, then baking soda. In another bowl, sift or mix together flour, baking powder, cocoa powder and salt. Combine dry ingredients with butter mixture with milk; stir in vanilla. Fill prepared muffin tins half full of batter. Bake in a preheated 350F oven for about 10 minutes or until a tester inserted in centre comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes in pan. Turn out onto rack and cool completely.

VANILLA FILLING:
In top of a double boiler, set over boiling water, combine egg whites, granulated sugar, salt and water. With an electric mixer, beat until stiff and fluffy, about 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from heat and beat in vanilla.

CHOCOLATE ICING:
Cream soft butter with cocoa powder. Blend in cream and vanilla. Stir in sifted icing (confectioner's) sugar until icing is of spreading consistency.

Slice cakes in half horizontally. Fill with Vanilla Filling and spread tops and sides with Chocolate Icing.

MAKES:about 12 MEDIUM or 24 SMALL MUFFIN SIZED CAKES SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Grand Marnier Nanaimo Bars

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub Graham wafer crumbs
1 cub Coconut, unsweetened, flaked
½ cub Pecans; toasted, chopped
2/3 cub Butter
1/3 cub Cocoa powder; unsweetenedsifted
¼ cub Sugar, granulated
1 Egg; beaten

GRAND MARNIER LAYER:
2 cub Icing Sugar
¼ cub Butter; softened
¼ cub Grand Marnier;or orangeliqueur
1 tablespoon Orange rind; coarsely grated

CHOCOLATE TOPPING:
1 tablespoon Butter
4 ounce Semisweet chocolate; melted

Preparation:

In bowl, stir together crumbs, coconut and pecans. In small saucepan, gently heat butter, cocoa and sugar until butter melts. Remove from heat; whisk in egg. Blend into crumb mixture. Press into greased 9 inch square cake pan. Bake in 350F oven for 10 minutes. Let cool on rack.

Grand Marnier Layer: In bowl, place half of icing sugar with butter, mix in half of the icing sugar with butter; mix in Grand Marnier, remaining icing sugar and orange rind. Spread over base.

Chocolate Topping: Stir butter into chocolate until melted; spread evenly over Grand Marnier layer. Let cool for 20 minutes in refrigerator; cut into bars.
(Bars can be covered, refrigerated up to 2 weeks, or frozen up to 2 months. Let soften slightly before serving.

VARIATION: CLASSIC NANAIMO BARS
Make base and Chocolate Topping as above. In layer, substitute milk for Grand Marnier; add ½ tsp vanilla. Substitute 2 tsp grated lemon rind for orange juice.

SOURCE:_Canadian Living's Desserts_ by Elizabeth Baird

Grandmother's Molasses Taffy

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub Molasses
½ cub Sugar, granulated
½ cub Brown sugar
1/3 cub -Water
2 tablespoon Butter
¼ teaspoon Baking soda
1 pinch -Salt

Preparation:

Tire a la Melasse de Grand-Mere

Quebec's sweet tooth is often satisfied by this old-fashioned candy made from molasses and sugar. This recipe belongs to Marguerite Legault, a member of Les Fermieres de Thuroso, a rural woman's group in the town on the Ottawa River.

In a medium, heavy saucepan, combine molasses, granulated and brown sugars and water. Heat to boiling and stir to dissolve sugars. Let mixture boil, without stirring, until syrup reaches the hard ball stage (260F/125C) on a candy thermometer. Remove from heat, stir in butter, baking soda, and salt. Immediately pour onto a buttered marble slab or baking sheet.
When cool enough to handle, butter hands and gather taffy into a ball.
Pull taffy between hands and continually stretch and fold again until taffy turned lighter in colour (this can take from 5 to 15 minutes.) Stretch and twist taffy into a rope about 1 inch thick and cut into pieces using buttered scissors. Wrap each piece in waxed paper.
MAKES: ABOUT 48 PIECES

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Green Tomato Soup

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 cub Tomatoes; greenpeeled & chopped fine
1 Onion; chopped
¼ teaspoon Cinnamon
⅛ teaspoon Cloves; ground
1 teaspoon Sugar
¼ teaspoon -Pepper
2 cub -Water
¼ teaspoon Baking soda
3 tablespoon Butter
3 tablespoon Flour; all purpose
4 cub Milk

Preparation:

Place in the saucepan; the tomatoes, onion, cinnamon, ground cloves, sugar, pepper and water. Bring to a boil and boil for 30 minutes. Add the soda.
Melt the butter, add the flour. Mix and add the milk. Cook till creamy, stirring constantly. Add green tomatoes to the cream. Mix thoroughly. Salt to taste and serve.

from the Quebec section of the _The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Hardy Vegetable Soup

Servings: 10

Ingredients:

4 quart Water
¾ cub Celery, chopped
¾ cub Onion, chopped
2 Garlic cloves, chopped
1 cub Carrots, sliced
2 cub Potatoes, diced
2 tablespoon Canola oil
½ cub Tomato paste
½ cub Green pepper, diced
1 cub Mixed vegetables *
½ tablespoon Sweet basil
Salt & pepper to taste
½ cub Macaroni
½ cub Pot barley
2 cub Chicken, beef,ham (leftovers
2 cub Coarsely chopped cabbage
1 Tomato, chopped

Preparation:

In a soup pot saute the celery, onion and garlic in oil for 5 minutes. Add water, vegetables, pot barley, meats, seasonings. Bring to the boil and simmer for 1 ¼ hours. For last ¼ hour add cabbage and macaroni.
* Soup mix

from Fillmore, Sask.
Lindsey Jones, F-Intercook

Herbs Salees (Salted Herbs)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Onion; finely chopped
4 cub Chives; or onion shootscut into ½ inch pieces
½ cub Salt

Preparation:

"Salted herbs are a central element in traditional Acadian cuisine; they are a basic ingredient in fricot, soups and most dishes which use meat and fish. Traditionally made with chives, shallots and onion shoots, salted herbs may also contain finely chopped onions."

Layer the ingredients in a stoneware or glass pot. Let the mixture stand for several days until a brine is formed. Use as a seasoning in a variety of fish and meat dishes.

SOURCE:_A Taste of Acadie_ by Marie Cormier-Boudreau

Jambon De Le Cabane A Sucre ( Sugar House Ham)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Ham; 8 to 10 lbs
3 quart Apple juice or Maple sap
2 cub Maple sugar
1 teaspoon Mustard; hot dry
2 teaspoon Cloves; ground
¼ cub -Water
2 cub Raisins

Preparation:

Bring the apple juice or maple sap to a boil and place ham into it. Cover and simmer over low heat for 3 hours, or till the ham is tender. Remove meat from liquid and trim off rind only. Place the sugar, mustard, cloves and water in saucepan, and add one cup of the cooking juice and 2 cups of the raisins. Simmer 5 minutes, and place ham in dripping pan and pour sauce over it. Bake at 300F for 30 minutes.
Thicken the juice to taste with browned flour, blended with cold water.
Serve the delicious sauce with the warm ham (which is equally good cold).

from the Quebec section of _The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme Jehane Benoit

Jellied Moose Nose

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Upper jawbone of a moose
1 Onion; sliced
1 Garlic clove
1 tablespoon Mixed pickling spice
1 teaspoon Salt
½ teaspoon Pepper
¼ cub Vinegar

Preparation:

1. Cut the upper jaw bone of the moose just below the eyes.

2. Place in a large kettle of scalding water and boil for 45 minutes.

3. Remove and chill in cold water.

4. Pull out all the hairs - these will have been loosened by the boiling and should come out easily ( like plucking a duck).

5. Wash thoroughly until no hairs remain.

6. Place the nose in a kettle and cover with fresh water.

7. Add onion, garlic, spices and vinegar

8. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until the meat is tender.
Let cool overnight in the liquid.

9. When cool, take the meat out of the broth, and remove and discard the bones and the cartilage. You will have two kinds of meat, white meat from the bulb of the nose, and thin strips of dark meat from along the bones and jowls.

10. Slice the meat thinly and alternate layers of white and dark meat in a loaf pan.

11. Reheat the broth to boiling, then pour the broth over the meat in the loaf pan.

12. Let cool until jelly has set. Slice and serve cold.

I must confess I have not yet tried this recipe, mainly for lack of a moose nose... But, sometime, maybe...

"Northern Cookbook" from the Ministry of Indian Affairs, Ottawa, Canada, edited by Eleanor A. Ellis

From: CAMPBELL@ubvm.cc.buffalo.edu (Roger Campbell) From: KAREN MINTZIAS Refer#: NONE Conf: (1668) L-CUISINE

Lassy Tart

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Egg
1 cub Molasses
1 cub Bread crumbs, soft
Pastry for 8 inch latticetop pie

Preparation:

"Molasses is a common ingredients on Newfoundland cooking; "lassy" tarts, pies. dumplings, puddings. cakes and sauces have been popular for generations."

Beat egg; beat in molasses. Stir in bread crumbs. Line 8 inch pie plate with pastry; pour in molasses mixture. Arrange strips of pastry over top to create lattice pattern.
Bake in 400F oven for 20 minutes or until done. Serve hot or cold.
MAKES: 4-6 SERVINGS

SOURCE: Canadian Living magazine

Leftover Turkey Or Chicken Hash

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

2 tablespoon Butter; melted or chickenfat (up to 3T)
1 Onion; thinly sliced
½ cub Celery; diced
2 cub Turkey; cooked,diced(up to 3 cups)

SAUCE:
2 tablespoon Turkey or chicken fat(I would use butter)
3 tablespoon Flour
2 ½ cub -Water
½ teaspoon Savory
½ teaspoon Salt
½ teaspoon Pepper
¼ cub Cream

HOT BISCUITS:
2 cub Flour; all purpose
1 tablespoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon Salt
¾ cub Cream
2 Eggs; beaten

Preparation:

La fricasee fatuguee

Heat in frying pan 2-3 Tbsp melted butter or turkey or chicken fat. Add thinly sliced onion and diced celery. Heat 5-8 minutes over low heat, stirring often. Add 2-3 cups cooked turkey. Cook 5 minutes over low heat.

Sauce: Brown the chicken fat (I would use butter) and flour well before adding water. Add savory, salt and pepper to taste. When sauce is smooth and creamy, add ¼ cup cream and any remaining turkey or chicken gravy.
Pour over turkey. Simmer 15 minutes, then serve with hot biscuits and pickled beets.

Hot Biscuits: Sift together in bowl, flour, baking powder (no error in amount) and salt. Mix together cream with 2 beaten eggs. Add to flour and mix just enough to moisten; the dough is rather soft and should remain lumpy. Stir as little as possible. Drop by spoonfuls on a greased cookie sheet. Cook 16 minutes at 400F.

from Mme. Benoit, "In days that followed Christmas, every bit of the turkey was used - the bones for soup, the skin, diced and crisped in the oven til browned, then served, instead of butter, on toasted homemade bread. So, when it came time to make hash from all the little bits and pieces, the children felt that the poor turkey must be tired (fatiguee), hence the name.

Source: _My Grandmother's Kitchen_ by Mme. Benoit

Les Petoncles a la Nage (Scallop Soup)

Servings: 2

Ingredients:

1 cub White wine;dry
1 cub Fish stock
¼ cub Carrots;julienne strips of
¼ cub Turnips;julienne strips of
¼ cub Leeks;julienne strips ofSalt & white ground pepper
12 large fresh

Preparation:

Les Petoncles a la Nage

Claude Cyr, chef-proprietor of Au cion del la baie in Metis sur Mer, makes a simple soup from scallops and vegetables.

In a medium saucepan, bring wine, fish, stock and vegetables to a boil, season with salt and pepper to taste. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender-crisp. Place 6 scallops in each of 2 heated bowls. Divide the very hot stock among the bowls, stir briefly and serve at once.
SERVES: 2

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Maple Baked Chicken Breasts

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

4 Chicken breasts;single
¼ cub Flour;all purposeSalt & ground black pepper
2 tablespoon Butter
½ cub Maple syrup
1 teaspoon Savory,dried
½ teaspoon Thyme, dried
¼ teaspoon Sage, dried
1 Onion; sliced
½ cub -Water

Preparation:

Poitrine de Poulet au Sirop D'Erable

Chicken and pork are often baked or braised in maple syrup in the Beauce.
This easy recipe for chicken breasts can also be used with a whole cut-up broiler-fryer chicken. It's from the collection of Jeanne d'Arc Nadeau, long-time proprietor of Le Danube Bleu reception hall in St. Marie and a cookbook author.

Dredge chicken pieces in flour seasoned with salt and pepper to taste. In a heavy, flameproof casserole, heat butter until bubbling and brown chicken pieces. Pour maple syrup over chicken. Sprinkle with savory, thyme and sage. Arrange onion slices on top of chicken pieces. Pour water into the bottom of the casserole. Bake, uncovered in 350F oven for 50 to 60 minutes or until tender, basting occasionally with pan juices.
SERVES: 4

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Maple Syrup Broilers

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 Chicken, broilers:young,tender
FlourSalt & pepper
4 tablespoon Butter
2 Onions, large;thinly sliced
1 pinch Aniseed
1 pinch Savory
8 tablespoon Maple syrup; 1 Tbsp perpiece of chicken
½ cub Cider or water

Preparation:

Poussins au sirop d'erable (pour la visite)

From Mme Benoit, "This was a dish for company and always a source of discussion between my grandparents as they had to decide which of the chickens were the most tender. I still have the earthenware dish and I often (not just for company) make this delicious casserole.

Quarter 2 very tender young broiler. Roll each piece in flour seasoned with salt and pepper. Brown in 4 Tbsp butter. Place the chicken pieces,as they are browned in an attractive ovenproof earthenware casserole. Add 2 large thinly sliced onions to the fat in the fry pan, brown, and pour on top of the chicken. Salt and pepper. Sprinkle with a pinch of aniseed and savory and pour 1 Tbsp maple syrup over each piece of chicken. Deglaze the frying pan with ½ cup cider or water and pour over the chicken. Bake 40 minutes, uncovered, in a 350F oven.

Source:_My Grandmother's Kitchen_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Maple Syrup Pie

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

½ cub -Cold water
¼ cub Flour;all purpose
1 cub Maple syrup;pure
1 Egg;lightly beaten
2 tablespoon Butter
1 Pie shell;8 " baked

Preparation:

Tarte au sirop d'erable
"This classic sweet of old Quebec has a smooth, rich filling, typically shallow and very sweet. Variations of the traditional recipes are still popular in Quebec. ... Syrup, sugar or molasses pies of all kinds were popular in every region in pioneer days. In Quebec Maple Syrup Pie (Tarte au sirop d'erable) and Sugar Pie (tarte au sucre) made use of local maple syrup and maple sugar when available, or brown sugar for economy.
Backwoods Pie , using brown sugar plus maple or corn syrup, appears in early Nova Scotia cookbooks as well as national books such as the Five Roses Cookbook (1915) Molasses Pie (tarte a la ferlouche or tarte a la molasses in Quebec) and Lassy Tart (in Newfoundland) was usually lightly spiced and thickened with bread crumbs. Shoofly Pie, most common in Mennonite areas, had molasses and brown sugar filling with crumbs on top.
In the early years, when ingredients were scare, molasses was a standby everywhere.)

Whisk water with flour until smooth; stir into syrup in small heavy saucepan. Stir in egg; cook over medium -low heat, stirring, until thick, about 7 minutes. Stir in butter until melted. Pour into pie shell. Let cool.

SOURCE: The 2nd decade chapter, _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Maple Syrup Tart

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 ½ cub Maple syrup
1 cub Whipping cream
¼ cub Cornstarch
¼ cub -Cold water
1 Pie shell, 9";baked, crust

Preparation:

Rich and simple, this delectable pie recipe belongs to Rose-Aime Dumais, who runs a maple syrup operation, Erabliere Dumais, at St. Alexandre near Riviere du Loup.

In saucepan, combine maple syrup and cream. Blend in cornstarch and water together until smooth. Bring filling to a boil over medium heat and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly until thickened.
Pour filling into baked pie shell and let cool until set.
SERVES 6-8

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Maple Tourlouche ( Upside Down Cake)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub Maple
1 tablespoon Butter; softened
3 tablespoon Sugar
1 Egg
1 cub Flour, all purpose
2 teaspoon Baking powder
⅛ teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Nutmeg or cinnamon
½ cub Milk
¼ cub Nutmeats, finely chopped (up

Preparation:

Bring syrup to a boil and pour into a generously buttered 8 by 8 by 2 baking dish. Let stand in a warm place, With a large spoon beat butter, sugar and egg together until creamy. Mix remaining dry ingredients and add with the milk to the creamed mixture, stirring until well blended. Place as four large balls into hot syrup, then stretch dough with two forks until all are joined together. This is easy because the dough gets soft when it comes in contact with the hot syrup. If using nut meats, add them to the hot syrup. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Tastes great with ice cream or whipping cream, served warm.

SOURCE: Mme. Jehane Benoit. in _The Canadiana Cookbook_

Matrimonial Cake

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 ½ cub Flour, all purpose
1 ½ cub Rolled oats
1 cub Brown sugar; packed
½ teaspoon Baking soda
¼ teaspoon -Salt
¾ cub Butter; softened

FILLING:
2 cub Dates; chopped, pitted
½ cub Sugar, granulated
1 teaspoon Lemon juice
¾ cub -Boiling water

Preparation:

"This recipe in some old cookbooks is called Date Sandwich Cake. Other variations are Raisin Squares or Fig Squares. ..
Date Squares (Matrimonial Cake, if you happen to come from the West) are a real nostalgia treat. The fillings in the 30s recipes was extremely sweet.
Today's versions reduce the sugar in the filling, since the dates are sweet enough, and are often microwaved. Raisin Puff, an old favorite in P.E.I. is somewhat similar, with raisin filling sandwiched between layers of soft cookie dough instead of an oatmeal mixture."

Filling: In saucepan, cook dates, sugar, lemon juice and water over medium heat, stirring often, until the dates are soft, about 15 minutes. Let cool.
In a bowl, combine flour, rolled oats, sugar, baking soda and salt; blend in butter until mixture is crumbly. Pat half onto bottom of 9 inch square pan. Spread filling evenly over the top. Sprinkle with the remaining flour mixture, patting lightly. Bake in a 350F oven for 30 to 35 minutes or until nicely browned. Let cool; cut into squares.

MAKES: 36 SQUARES
VARIATION: Mincemeat Squares : Use 2 cups mincemeat instead of date filling.

SOURCE: _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking: 1900 Through the 90s" by Carol Ferguson and Margaret Fraser

Memorable Mincemeat

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

¾ cub Suet;minced (or butter/marg)
2 cub Seedless raisins
2 ½ cub Currants
1 ¾ cub Brown sugar
1 ½ teaspoon Cinnamon
1 ½ teaspoon Mace or cloves
1 ½ teaspoon Nutmeg
¾ teaspoon Salt
4 Apples, peeled, grated
1 cub Candied citron
1 Lemon (rind and juice only)
1 Orange (rind and juice only)

Preparation:

Makes 8 cups (not 8 servings)

Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Refrigerate or freeze in recipe size portions. (Dark or light raisins may be used in place of currants, and ground cloves substituted for mace. ER)

Note: Processing mincemeat is recommended for long term storage 1-2 years. Spoon into pint sealers. Process 30 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Source: Festive Favourites, TransAlta Utilities Shared by Elizabeth Rodier, March 1993

From Blue Ribbon Cook Book, Winnipeg Manitoba 1905 - Mince Pie Hints Dried apples soaked in water a few hours make a very fair substitute for fresh apples in mince pies. Dried cherries and other fruit prepared with sugar can be soaked 10-12 hours in a very little water and then both water and fruit used instead of raisins. They will be much cheaper and will answer very well. Economical housewives will often find hints like these very serviceable.

From: ELIZABETH RODIER Refer#: NONE Conf: (1010) F-COOKING

Miel aux Trefles ( Cloverleaf Honey)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub White sugar
1 cub -Water
2 cub Clover blossoms
5 Wild roses

Preparation:

"Honey was often made with cloves and wild roses boiled in sugar."

Boil the sugar until the sugar has dissolved. Add the clover and roses and let the mixture stand for 30 minutes. Bring to a boil for 3 minutes and strain the syrup through a cheesecloth or fine meshed strainer. Bring the syrup to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
Pour the honey into jars, and store in a cool, dark place.

SOURCE:_A Taste of Acadie_ by Marie Cormier-Boudreau

Mock Duck

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 Onion;chopped
½ cub Celery;chopped
½ cub Mushroom;chopped
1 tablespoon Butter
¾ cub Dry bread crumbs
½ teaspoon Savory,dried
¼ teaspoon Thyme,driedsalt & pepper
1 pound Round steak
1 tablespoon Vegetable oil
¾ cub Beef stock

Preparation:

"Today a nonstick frypan works well, but just as in the 30s, a black cast iron one is great, too. Thicken the gravy with flour if desired. ... With the prairie sloughs dried up and little snow in the winter, there were very few wild birds in the worst years of the 30s. Stuffed, thinly pounded less-tender cuts of beef made an adequate substitute. Some books called for flank steak, other for round steak. Veal birds are similar, Rouladen, a German dish, is made with meat spread with mustard and wrapped around dill pickle spears. And in many regions of Canada, venison, moose and caribou were used in place of beef. In Newfoundland, savory seasons the stuffing and salt pork tops the meat rolls.

In a skillet, cook onion, celery and mushrooms in butter until softened.
Remove from heat; stir in bread crumbs, savory, thyme, salt and pepper to taste and just enough water or stock to moisten.
Pound meat into ¼ inch thickness. Cut into 4 or 5 serving pieces; spread with stuffing almost to edges. Roll up each from widest sides; secure with string. In skillet, brown rolls in oil. Add stock; cover and simmer for 1 hour, turning and basting occasionally, or bake in 325F oven for 1 hour.
MAKES: 4 or 5 servings

SOURCE: The Thirties chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Nanaimo Bars

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

First layer:
½ cub Butter; unsalted
¼ cub Sugar
5 tablespoon Cocoa powder; unsweetened
1 Egg; beaten
1 ¾ cub Graham wafer crumbs
1 cub Coconut; sweetened
½ cub Almonds; finely chopped
Second layer:
½ cub Butter; unsalt, room temp
3 tablespoon Cream
2 tablespoon Vanilla custard powder (eg.
2 cub Icing sugar
Icing:
4 ounce Chocolate; semisweet (4 sq)
2 tablespoon Butter; unsalted

Preparation:

For 1st Layer: Place butter, sugar and cocoa powder in double boiler over barely simmering water. Stir occasionally till melted. Add egg and stir to cook and thicken. Remove from heat and stir in graham wafer crumbs, coconut and almonds. Press firmly in ungreased 8" square pan. Chill.
For 2nd layer: Cream together butter, cream and custard powder together in bowl. Gradually beat in icing sugar till light and fluffy. Spread over first layer. Chill. For Icing: melt chocolate and butter in top of double boiler over barely simmering water (or in microwave). Stir to combine. Cool to room temp. Spread evenly over 2nd layer with spatula. Chill. Cut into bars. MAKES: 16-24

a contest winner for best Nanaimo bar in Nanaimo, British Columbia. very sweet! Source: Toronto Sun-contest winner

Nanaimo Bars - Revisionist

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

¾ cub Butter & 1 tbsp
5 tablespoon Sugar
5 tablespoon Cocoa
1 teaspoon Peppermint extract
1 Egg
2 cub Graham cracker crumbs
½ cub Vanilla pudding
2 cub Sugar; icing
2 ounce Chocolate; unsweetened

Preparation:

Heat ½ cup butter, sugar, cocoa and peppermint in saucepan. Beat in egg and stir till consistency of custard. Remove from heat and stir in crushed graham crackers. Press mixture into greased 8" square pan. Cream together ¼ cup of remaining butter, the pudding and icing sugar. Spread over graham cracker layer. Melt chocolate with remaining 1 Tbsp butter, then pour over second layer. Let sit for a few minutes, then refrigerate for 1 hour before cutting.
This recipe does not use the traditional custard powder and therefore may be used by those who are unable to obtain custard powder (ie. Americans)

Makes: 3 dozen squares

Source: Harrowsmith Cookbook

Nanaimo Bars -2

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

BOTTOM LAYER:
½ cub Butter
¼ cub Sugar, granulated
1/3 cub Cocoa powder;unsweetened
1 Egg;beaten
1 ¾ cub Graham wafer cracker crumbs
½ cub Nuts;finely chopped
1 cub Coconut;shredded

MIDDLE LAYER:
½ cub Butter
3 tablespoon Light cream
2 tablespoon Custard powder;*
2 cub Icing Sugar

TOP LAYER:
4 ounce Semisweet chocolate
2 tablespoon Butter

Preparation:

* Anne's note: Custard powder can be found in the baking section of Canadian supermarkets. I have seen the substitution of instant vanilla pudding or instant vanilla pudding powder in American cookbooks.

"Recipes for this no-bake treasure appear in countless cookbook as Chocolate Fridge Cake, New York Slice, Miracle Bars, Ribbon Squares and many other names. But the origin of Nanaimo Bars is still a hot topic of debate.
The Woman's Auxiliary to the Nanaimo Hospital Cook Book (1952) included three similar recipes (two called Chocolate Squares and one Chocolate Slice). These recipes appeared under the name Nanaimo Bars in the Vancouver Sun in the early 50's and in the B.C. Women's Institute Centennial of B.C. Cookbook in 1958. The test kitchens of food companies developed various versions with their own products.
Since the 50s, endless variations include Minted, Grand Marnier, Cherry, Pina Colada, Mocha, and Peanut Butter Nanaimo Bars...During the 50s, a Dairy Food Service Bureau recipe called Dominoes suggested piping a little bit of the middle layer into dots on top to give a domino pattern when cut."

Bottom Layer: In double boiler, melt butter, sugar and cocoa; add egg and cook until thickened. Add crumbs, nuts and coconut. Press into ungreased 9 inch square pan.
Middle Layer: Beat together butter, cream, custard powder and sugar; spread over base. Chill.
Top Layer: Melt chocolate with butter; cool slightly. Pour over second layer; chill. Cut into bars.

SOURCE: The Fifties chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_ by Carol Ferguson and Margaret Fraser

Nova Scotia Oatcakes

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 cub Rolled oats; not instant
3 cub Flour, all purpose;sifted
1 cub Brown sugar
1 teaspoon Baking soda
2 teaspoon -Salt
1 ½ cub Shortening
2/3 cub -Cold water, up to ¾ cup

Preparation:

Combine oats, flour, sugar, soda and salt. Cut in the shortening with a pastry blender or 2 knives until the mixture is crumbly.
Using a fork, gradually add enough water for moisture to form a ball.
Roll out ¼" thick on a lightly floured board. Cut into circles and place on greased baking sheet.
Bake at 350F for 15 minutes.
Yield about 4 dozen, depending on spoon size.

SOURCE: _Classic Canadian Cooking_ by Elizabeth Baird

Oatcakes (not Sweet)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 ½ cub Oats; quick
1 teaspoon -salt
2 tablespoon Flour
½ cub Shortening
½ cub -water ,approx.

Preparation:

Combine the oats, salt and flour. Cut in the shortening and add enough water to dampen and form a ball. (A food processor does the work in a jiffy). Leave to swell for ten minutes. Divide the dough and roll each part to ⅛" thickness; slide onto ungreased cookie sheet, indent in squares with a pastry wheel or knife. Bake in 350F for about ½ hour but watch that they don't turn brown.

Sweet Oatcake: Add 1 cup sugar to recipe.

Anne's note: That recipe is labelled "Bannock" in the title in cookbook but it far more a nonsweet oatcake in the tradition of Walker's oatcakes (it appears as "oatcakes" in the book's index.

Source: _More Baking with Schmecks Appeal_)

Pate A La Rapure (grated Pie)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Chicken 5-6 lb boiling
5 pound Potatoes
2 Onions; medium- chopped
1 Celery stalk-diced
1 Carrot; grated
¼ teaspoon Thyme or1 bay leaf
Salt & pepper

Preparation:

Cut chicken into individual pieces. Place in saucepan. Cover with cold water, bring to a boil. Add onions, celery, carrot, thyme or bay leaf, salt and pepper to taste. Cover and simmer 1 ½ to 2 hours or till chicken is tender. Peel and grate potatoes over a bowl of cold water. When chicken is cooked squeeze 1 or 2 cups potato at a time in a piece of cotton till quite dry. Place in a saucepan. When potatoes are all squeezed dry add as much boiling broth from the chicken as needed to almost cover potatoes.
Stir till thoroughly mixed. Salt lightly. Simmer over low heat about 10 minutes. Grease generously a 8" square baking dish. Spread half potatoes in the bottom of the pan. Bone the hot chicken and spread over the potatoes, cover with the half of the potatoes. Mince one small onion very finely, add ¼ tsp pepper and 2 slices fat salt pork cut in very small dice. Bake ½ hour in 350F oven or till top is golden brown and crisp. Serve hot.

from the Acadian section of _The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit.
To quote the author, "R^ape in French means grated, so in either case, r^apure or rappie" indicated that fact. A great deal of French and English is mixed together in the Acadian language") (I had to leave out the French accents.)

Pate aux Patates (Potato Pie)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

5 Potatoes; to 6 hot
Milk
2 teaspoon Butter
2 Egg yolks
1 Onion; finely chopped
¼ cub Celery stalk; & leavesfinely chopped
1 tablespoon Parsley;chopped, fresh
1 pinch Savory, dried -OR-
1 pinch -Chives, freshSalt & ground pepper
Pastry for double crust 9"pie

Preparation:

Pate aux Patates

This potato pie makes a warming supper dish. It was a Friday favorite in the days when the meatless rule was observed in French Catholic families, says Nicole Kretz.

Line a 9-inch pie plate with pastry, Mash potatoes with enough milk to make a smooth puree; add butter and 1 egg yolk. Combine potatoes with onion, celery, parsley and savoury; season with salt and pepper to taste.
Sprinkle potato mixture in pie shell. Cover with top crust, trim and crimp edges to seal and cut steam vents. Brush top crust with remaining egg yolk.bake pie in a preheated 400F oven for 30 to 40 minutes or until pastry is golden.
SERVES: 6-8

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by JULIAN ARMSTRONG

Pate aux Poireaux (Leek Tart)

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

6 tablespoon Butter
4 Leeks; up to 5finely chopped
½ cub -Water
2 tablespoon Flour;all purposeSalt & ground black pepper
1 Egg
2 tablespoon Light cream
1 cub White cheddar cheese;mildgrated
Pastry for 9 inch tart shell

Preparation:

Pate aux Poireaux

This leek and cheese quiche from Ile d'Orleans is related to the Flamiche aux poireuax, a savory leek tart made in northern Franch and Flanders. The same recipe can also be used to make small tarts.

Heat 4 tablespoons of the butter in a heavy saucepan, add leeks and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. Add water, cover and simmer gently for 20 to 25 minutes or until tender.
In another saucepan, melt the remaining two tablespoons butter, blend in flour and cook over medium heat until bubbling. Blend in leek mixture, bring to a boil and season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat.
Beat egg and cream together, blend with leek mixture and pour into unbaked tart shell. Sprinkle top evenly with cheese. Bake in preheated 400F oven for 25 to 30 minutes or until cheese begins to brown.
SERVES: 6

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Petits Bateaux dans la Sauce (Little Boats in Sauce)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

CRUST:
2 cub Flour
2 teaspoon Cream of tartar
1 teaspoon Baking soda
½ teaspoon -Salt
6 tablespoon Lard
½ cub Milk

SAUCE:
3 tablespoon Butter
1 cub Molasses
2 cub -Water; or milk
2 cub Brown sugar
3 ½ cub -Water

Preparation:

Mix the dry ingredients. Blend in the lard to form a coarse mixture.
Gradually add milk until the dough is smooth but not too sticky. Roll the dough until it is ¼ inch thick. Cut the dough into 4"X2" rectangles.
Pinch together the ends to form shapes ressembling small boats.
Put the ingredients for the sauce in a casserole dish, place it in the oven set at 350F and bring to a gentle boil.
Put the "little boats" in the sauce in a casserole dish, and bake at 350F for about 30 minutes.
To serve, remove the pastries from the casserole dish & cover with the sauce.

SOURCE: _A Taste of Acadie_ by Marielle Cormier-Boudreau

Pets de Soeurs ( Cinnamon Rolls)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

CRUST:
3 cub Flour
2 tablespoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon -Salt
1 teaspoon Sugar
½ cub Lard
1 cub Milk

FILLING:
2 tablespoon Butter; softened
1 cub Brown sugar
1 teaspoon Cinnamon
1 cub -Water

Preparation:

To quote the author Marie Cormier-Boudreau, "These pastries which resemble cinnamon rolls, have been made throughout Acadia for many, many years. Although they are usually given the colourful name Pet de Soeurs (literally nun's fart), they are also be called (sic) Rosettes, Rondelles, Hirondells, Bourriques de veilles, Bourriques de soeurs or Bourriques de viarges (Rosettes, Slices, Swallows, Old Women's Belly Buttons, Nun's Belly Buttons and Virgin's Belly Buttons."

Sift the dry ingredients together. Blend in the lard to form a coarse mixture. Gradually add the milk until a soft dough is formed. Roll the dough until it is fairly thin, although it should be thicker than a regular pie crust.
Butter the dough with soft butter, cover with ¼ inch of brown sugar and sprinkle with cinnamon. Roll the dough up like a jelly roll and slice into circles about ½ inch thick.
Pour water into a casserole dish. Put the sliced dough into the casserole and bake at 375F for about 30 minutes or until the pets de soeur are golden brown.

VARIATION: Cranberry jam may be substituted for the sugar and the cinnamon.

SOURCE: _A Taste of Acadie_ by Marie Cormier-Boudreau

Pictou County Oatcakes

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub Oatmeal
1 cub Flour
1 cub Brown sugar
1 teaspoon -Salt
¾ cub Shortening
¼ teaspoon Baking soda
¼ cub -boiling water

Preparation:

Combine dry ingredients and cut in shortening. Dissolve baking soda in the boiling water and add, continuing to mix with a knife. Mold with the hands and shape into a long wedge. Slice off and bake in a 400F oven for 10 minutes.
This recipe comes from the county where the Scots first landed in Canada (and where my dad was born.) To quote the author, "Our Scottish ancestors used "real" oatmeal when they made their favorite oatcakes. However sugar did creep in, as indicated by this 75 year old recipe. (The book was published in 1971 so the recipe would be form the year 1894.)

Source: _Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens_

Pommes Caramel (caramel Apples)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1/3 cub Butter
1 cub Sugar; Brown pref.
1 teaspoon Vanilla
6 Apples

Preparation:

Melt butter in frypan and add sugar. Stir till sugar is dissolved or softened and everything is well blended, then add vanilla.
Core unpeeled apples, cut them into quarters and add to hot sugar. Simmer uncovered over medium heat, basting often with the syrup for 15-20 minutes.

To quote the author, "Make these with the first fresh apples. In Quebec we use the first ripe Melbas. Served hot or cold, they are superb on ice cream."
Source: _Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Pot En Pot

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 pound Fatty beef; up to 3 lb
5 cub -Salted water
5 Potatoes; sliced or cut inlarge pieces
1 Onion; up to 2 onionschoppedsalt & pepper
Summer savory; to taste

POUTINES (DUMPLINGS:
1 cub Flour
½ teaspoon -Salt
1 tablespoon Baking powder
½ cub -Cold water

Preparation:

"Although pot-en-pot contains the same ingredients as fricot, the method of preparation is significantly different. The most commonly used meats for this dish are chicken and hare but beef, pork, duck or goose may also be used. In Cheticamp and on the Magadalen Islands, pot-en-pot is called Etouffrage."

Poultines Blanches:
In a bowl, mix flour with salt and baking powder. Gradually add cold water to the dough as one would when making biscuits. Roll the dough fairly thin, cut into 1 ½ inch squares and place in fricot or other dish.
Cut the meats into pieces. Place the pieces in a large pot with the salted water and bring to a boil. Simmer until the meat is tender. Remove the meat from the pot, reserving the stock.
In the bottom of a second large pot, place a layer of potatoes, a layer of meat, a layer of chopped onion Season with salt, pepper and summer savory and continue adding until there are no ingredients left.
Add the stock from the simmered meat and just enough water to cover three quarters of the ingredients. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes or until the potatoes are tender.
Add Poutines Blanches (dumplings) 7 minutes before it is ready to be served, cover for the remaining 7 minutes.

VARIATIONS: To vary the taste, other spices such as cumin or coriander may be added to the pot-en-pot. The meat may be sauteed before being simmered to improve it's flavour. Handkerchief dumplings (included with Fricot a la Belette may be layered in with the ingredients at the beginning of the cooking time, instead of the dumplings used.

SOURCE: _A Taste of Acadie_ by Marie Cormier-Boudreau

Potage de ble ( Corn Soup)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub -Water
2 cub Milk
4 cub Corn kernels; freshfrozen may be used if outof season
1 teaspoon -Salt
2 tablespoon Butter
1/3 cub Celery;chopped
¼ cub Onion;chopped
¼ cub Leek;chopped,white part only
2 tablespoon Flour
½ cub Whipping creamSalt & ground black pepper

Preparation:

Potage du Ble

This fresh corn soup from Renard Jacques, chef at Auberge Benedict Arnold in St. Georges is rich and creamy. It may be made with frozen or canned corn kernels, but it won't have the same delicate sweetness.

Bring water to a boil in a large saucepan. Add milk, corn and salt; cook just until corn is tender. Strain cooking liquid into a bowl and set corn aside. Heat butter in same saucepan and saute celery, onion and leek until softened. Blend in flour; cook until bubbly. Stir in reserved corn cooking liquid. Bring to a boil, then partially cover and let simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.
Place corn and liquid in food processor or blender and puree in batches until smooth. Return to saucepan and add cream. Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper to taste. Reheat until piping hot.
SERVES: 4-6

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by JULIAN ARMSTRONG

Potato Scones

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 ½ cub Flour, all purpose
¼ cub Sugar, granulated; approx
1 tablespoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon -Salt
2 tablespoon Butter; or shortening
¼ cub Currants
2 Eggs
1/3 cub Milk
¾ cub Potatoes; mashed

Preparation:

"Potato scones reflect the influence of the Scottish in the Maritimes and their adaptibility in using the famous P.E.I. potato...Scones were a favorite Scottish tradition. According to _A Treasury of Nova Scotia Recipes_ "the difference between bannock and scone (which the Scots rhyme with 'on', not 'bone') is that the bannock is a rather large, round cake, and the scone is a smaller triangle or 'farl'..But local usages vary considerably, Scots being strong individualists.
A similar recipe for German Buns appears in an Ontario cookbook from the Kitchener area, where German settlers were predominant.
When Their Majesties King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Government House in Halifax on June 15,1939, scones were served. And Canadian Brits gathered for "tea at the Empress" in Victoria for scones and tea.

In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt; cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse meal. Beat eggs lightly; reserve 1 Tbsp. With fork, stir into dry ingredients along with milk and potatoes until well moistened.
Knead gently on a lightly floured surface about 20 times. Roll or pat into circle ½ inch thick. Place onto ungreased baking sheet; brush with reserved egg yolk and sprinkle with more sugar. Cut into 16 wedges, separating slightly.
Bake in 425F oven for 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned.
MAKES: 16 SCONES

VARIATIONS: RAISIN SCONES: Add ¾ cup raisins with dry ingredients OAT SCONES: Use ½ cup rolled oats in place of ½ cup flour

SOURCE: The 2nd decade chapter in _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_ by Carol Ferguson and Margaret Fraser

Pouding Aux Pommes Au Sirop D'erable (apple Maple Pudding)

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

3 Cooking apples, largeor 6 smallpeeled, cut into chunks
1 cub Maple syrup
1 Egg; beaten
1 tablespoon Melted butter
2 teaspoon Lemon juice
½ cub All-purpose flour
1 teaspoon Baking powder
1 pinch -salt
½ cub Raisins
Unsweetened whipped cream(optional)

Preparation:

Arrange apples in a greased 8 inch square baking pan. Pour ½ cup of the maple syrup over apples, stirring to coat well, and spread in an even layer.

In a bowl, combine beaten egg, butter and lemon juice with remaining ½ cup maple syrup. In another bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt.
Stir the dry ingredients into the egg mixture. Fold in raisins.

Pour batter evenly over apple pieces. Bake in preheated 375 deg F oven for 30 to 35 minutes or until top is lightly browned. Serve warm with unsweetened whipped cream, if desired.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by Linda Davis

Pouding Renverse des Bluets (Blueberry Upside Down Pudding)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 cub Blueberries;fresh -OR-
1 package -Blueberries, 300 gindividually frozen,unsweetened
¾ cub Sugar,granulated
1 teaspoon Lemon rind;grated
1 ¼ cub Flour;all purpose
1 ½ teaspoon Baking powder
¼ teaspoon -Salt
¼ cub Shortening
1 Egg;beaten
1 teaspoon Vanilla
2/3 cub Milk
Whipped cream -OR-
Ice cream; opt

Preparation:

Pouding Renverse des Bleuets

Lemon-flavoured cake batter baked over fresh blueberries makes a perfect dessert. When I was immersed in French language studies at Jonqiere's Centre linguistique, Jeannine Renouf treated me to this recipe and also to a version that she makes with wild raspberries. It was a delectable kind of immersion.

Combine blueberries, ¼ cup of the sugar and lemon rind in a buttered 8 inch square baking pan.
In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder and salt. In another bowl, cream shortening with remaining ½ cup sugar until fluffy. Beat in egg and vanilla. Add dry ingredients alternately with milk, blending well after each addition and finishing with dry ingredients.
Pour batter over fruit in pan and bake in a preheated 350F oven for about 40 minutes, or until a tester inserted in centre comes out clean.
Let cool slightly; turn out onto serving plate. Cut in squares and serve warm or at room temperature, with whipped or ice cream, if desired.
SERVES: 6-8

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Poutines Rapees

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

½ pound Salt pork, fatty
10 Potatoes; finely grated
4 Potatoes; cooked & mashedSalt & Pepper

Preparation:

"For many Acadians living in southeastern New Brunswick, Poultine Rapee, potato dumpling dish with a mixture of seasoned pork in the centre, is considered a national dish. In other parts of Acadia, these delicacies are prepared without the meat and fish is sometimes added to fricot. Although the greyish colour and gluey texture of the poutines makes them appear somewhat unappetizing, their taste more than compensates for their unattractive appearance."

Soak the pork overnight in cold water to remove the salt, and cut into cubes.
Extract the water from the grated potatoes by putting them in a cotton bag and squeezing vigourously.
Mix the mashed potatoes with grated potatoes. Season with salt and pepper.
Roll the potato mixture into balls resembling small snowballs. Make a hole in the centre of the potato ball and add 1 Tbsp of the salt pork. Close the hole and roll the poultines in flour.
Gently drop the poultines 2 or 3 at a time, into a large pot of boiling salted water, ensuring that the water is kept at a rolling boil. Simmer the poultines for 2-3 hours.
Eat the poultines hot with butter, salt and pepper, or as a dessert with sugar and molasses.
MAKES: 6 POULTINES

SOURCE:_A Taste of Acadie_ by Marielle Cormier-Boudrau

Pumpkin Potatoes

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

Pumpkin ;(equal parts of) peeled
Potatoes; peeled
1 Onion; finely chopped
Butter
Baconsalt & pepper to taste

Preparation:

Pommes de terre a la citronuille

The directions for this recipe are very loose; Boil together equal parts of peeled potatoes and pumpkin. When cooked, drain them, add 1 good sized onion, finely chopped and a piece of butter.
Mash all till creamy, season to taste and serve with golden sliced of fried salt pork or bacon.
To quote Mme. Benoit, "Grand-mere was a wizard with pumpkin. Her mashed potatoes pumpkin french fried chips were super. It's amazing how most of what we enjoyed in our youth remains a pleasure as we grow older.
In the autumn of 1959 I made these on my television show. The amount of mail requesting the recipe was unbelievable!"

Source: _My Grandmother's Kitchen_ by Madame Jehane Benoit

Quebec Apple Dumplings

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 Pie dough (double batch)
¼ cub Cheddar cheese-grated
12 Apples; medium- peeled &cored
½ cub Mincement
¼ cub Rum
Butter
¾ cub Sugar
¼ cub Sugar; Brown
¼ cub Cream
Lemon rind; ½ lemon

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 400F. Make enough pie enough to roll into 12 6"x6" squares (about a double batch.) Sprinkle each square with 1 tsp grated cheddar.
Peel and core apples and place one on each square. Fill the centre of each apple with 2 tsp (or 1 heaping tsp) of mincement, 1 tsp of rum, a dot of butter and 1 Tablespoon sugar. Bring diagonally opposite corners of dough over the apple to form ears at the top. Cover the 'ears' with aluminium foil. Mix the brown sugar, cream and grated lemon rind. Brush the dumplings with this mixture and bake 35 to 45 minutes in 400F oven.Remove foil, brush ears with cream mixture and return to oven till 'ears' are brown. Serve warm to plain cream or sweetened cream, flavoured with rum.

Note from Anne MacLellan: Mme Benoit does not give total amounts for cheese, sugar, mincement and rum. I used Meal Master's conversion to decimal and back to calculate the total amounts.

To quote Mme. Benoit,"In Quebec these were baked in deep brown earthenware pudding dishes and served on a hot wooden board or tray surrounded by autumn leaves or boughs cut from the Christmas tree. It was a traditional in our family to serve these dumplings after we had finished decorating the Christmas tree."

Source:_The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Quebec Poached Salmon

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

4 Salmon steaks 4-6
1 tablespoon Oil; salad
1 Lemon juice; from 1 lemon
Lemon peel; from ½ lemon
1 tablespoon Salt
1 Onion; small-quartered
4 Parsley sprigs
6 Peppercorns-crushed withback of spoon

SAUCE VERTE (GREEN SAUCE:
½ cub Green onion tops or: Chives
½ cub Green pepper
¼ cub Parsley
½ cub Spinach- uncooked
2 tablespoon Lemon juice
1 cub Mayonnaise

Preparation:

Spread the oil in a frypan or baking dish. Place the salmon steaks next to one another, but not overlapping. Add the lemon juice and peel, peppercorns, salt, onion and just enough hot water to cover the fish.
Cover and poach on top of the stove (if using frypan) over low heat, for 10-12 minutes or in 325F oven (in baking dish) for the same length of time or until the salmon flakes.
Allow the fish to cool in the liquid. Drain well and remove the skin.
Arrange on platter, then cover completely with the following sauce. Serve with a cucumber salad.

Sauce Verte:
Chop the vegetables coarsely and put in blender with lemon juice. Cover and blend until it turns into a sort of mush with small bits of this and that in it. Add the mayonnaise and blend.
If you don't have a blender, chop the ingredients very finely and blend them into the mayonnaise with the lemon juice, crushing them as much as possible to give color to the sauce.

From the author, "Use salmon steaks for this colourful and tasty dish. It is then easy to make it for 2 or 10."

Source: _The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Quebec Tourtiere

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

Pastry for 9"pie (lard istraditional)
1 pound Pork; lean ground
1 Onion; medium, choppedSalt & pepper
½ teaspoon Savory
Cloves; ground
¼ cub -Water; boiling

Preparation:

Mix meat, onion, spices in a saucepan. Add boiling water. Simmer, uncovered for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Skim off any fat.
Preheat oven to 375F. Roll out half of the pastry and line 9" pie plate.
Place filling in pie plate and cover with the remaining pastry. Prick with a fork. Bake at 375F for 30 minutes or till golden. Serve piping hot topped with homemade ketchup or chili sauce. SERVES 4-6

traditionally this is eaten hot after midnight mass on Christmas Eve.
Source: _Harrowsmith Cookbook 1_

Queen Elizabeth Cake 2

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub -Boiling water
1 cub Dates;chopped
1 teaspoon Baking soda
½ cub Butter
1 cub Sugar,granulated
1 Egg
1 teaspoon Vanilla
1 ½ cub Flour,all purpose
1 teaspoon Baking powder
½ teaspoon -Salt

BROILED TOPPING:
¼ cub Butter
½ cub Brown sugar;packed
¼ cub Light cream
¾ cub Coconut;shredded;half nutsif desired

Preparation:

"This date and nut cake always included a broiled topping. Lazy Daisy was a plain cake with the same topping. ...
Queen Elizabeth cakes have appeared in cook books coast to coast for many years. Some claim that the recipe was a favorite of the Queen Mother and given to worthy groups as a fund raiser during World War II. One from Quebec's Eastern Townships includes the footnote that says that, "This is not to be passed on but must be sold for charitable purposes for 15 cents.
In a reply to our query about the name of this recipe, the Queen Mother's Lady-in-Waiting writes; "I fear I have to tell you that, although we have known about this recipe for many years, it did not originate from either Buckingham Palace or Clarence House...However as Her Majesty always made it a rule, due to the number of requests received, never to give "favorite recipes", I fear that I have to tell you that you that should you wish to include this recipe in any cookbook, it should only be called a 'date and walnut cake' with no reference to the Queen Mother."

Pour water over dates and soda; let stand until lukewarm. In bowl, cream butter with sugar; beat in egg and vanilla. Mix together flour, baking powder and salt; add to creamed mixture alternately with date mixture.
Spread in a greased and floured 9 inch square cake pan. Bake in 350F oven for 40 minutes or until tester comes out clean.

Broiled Topping:
In a small heavy saucepan, combine butter, packed brown sugar, light cream and coconut (half nuts if desired). Bring to a boil, stirring; boil gently for 1 minute. Spread over warm baked cake; broil until bubbly and lightly browned, watching carefully.

SOURCE: The Forties chapter, _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_

Queen Elizabeth Cake 3

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

BATTER:
1 cub Dates
1 cub Boiling water
1 teaspoon Vanilla
¼ cub Margarine
1 cub Sugar
1 Egg, beaten
1 ½ cub Flour
1 teaspoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon Baking soda
½ teaspoon Salt

TOPPING:
6 tablespoon Brown sugar
3 tablespoon Butter
4 tablespoon Canned milk
1 cub Coconut
1 pinch Salt

Preparation:

Cook dates, water and vanilla to soft mass. Cream margarine, sugar and egg. Add dry ingredients to creamed mixture. Add date mixture. Pour into a 9 x 9 greased pan and bake at 325F for 35 minutes.

While cake is baking, put all the topping ingredients into a small pot and bring to a boil. Boil for 3 minutes. When cake is baked, remove from oven, spread topping on it and place under the broiler to brown. Watch carefully, because it could burn.
Helen Peagram, F-Cooking

Roast Venison

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

4 pound Venison roast;elk,moose,or deer)
2 tablespoon Flour
2 Cloves garlic (minced)
2 tablespoon Brown sugar
1 teaspoon Prepared mustard
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
¼ cub Vinegar or lemon juice
1 large Onion (sliced)
1 can Tomatoes (14 oz can)
MARINADE
½ cub Vinegar
2 Cloves garlic (minced)
2 tablespoon Salt
Cold water to cover meat

Preparation:

Marinade the venison over night in the refrigerator.
Season with salt, roll in flour and brown in hot skillet.
Place in crock-pot cooker and add remaining ingredients.
Cover and cook on low 10 to 12 hours.
MARINADE:
Mix ingredients together in a bowl just large enough to cover venison with water. No need to stir this marinade. Use for "red" meats (including rabbits) or game birds.

From: LINDSEY JONES
Conf: (1114) F-INTERCOOK

Runny Butter Tarts

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

¼ cub Raisins
16 Tart shells; baked
¼ cub Butter;soft
½ cub Sugar; brown, lightly packd
½ cub Corn syrup
1 Egg
1 teaspoon Vinegar
1 teaspoon Vanilla
Salt

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 400F. Sprinkle raisins evenly in baked shells. In bowl, cream together butter and sugar; beat in corn syrup, egg, vinegar, vanilla and salt. Pour into pastry shells, filling each ¾s full.
Bake in 400F oven for about 10 minutes or just till runny in centre. Let cool in pan for 1 minute, remove to rack and let cool completely.
Makes 16 tarts.
Source: FOOD magazine (now defunct)

Salted Herbs

Servings: 5

Ingredients:

1 cub Chopped fresh chives
1 cub Chopped fresh savoury
1 cub Chopped fresh parsley
1 cub Chopped fresh chervil
1 cub Grated carrots
1 cub Chopped celery leaves
1 cub Chopped green onions
¼ To ½ cup coarse salt

Preparation:

These seasonings seem to be added to a lot of traditional French- Canadian recipes. "Herbs preserved with vegetables and salt make a lively seasoning for soups-particularly pea soup - sauces, stews and omelettes. A commercial brand, Les Herbes Salees du bas du fleuve, is marketed by J.Y.
Roy of St. Flavie, Quebec. This recipe comes from the Metis district."

In a large bowl, combine herbs and vegetables. Layer 1 inch of herb mixture in the bottom of a crock or glass bowl and sprinkle with some of the salt. Repeat layers until all of the herb mixture and salt is used.
Cover and refrigerate for 2 weeks. Drain off accumulated liquid and pack herb mixture into sterilized jars. Refrigerate until ready to use. Makes about 5 to 6 cups.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by: Linda Davis

Saskatoon Pie

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

4 cub Saskatoon berries; calledServiceberries in the US
¼ cub -Water
2 tablespoon Lemon juice
¾ cub Sugar, granulated
3 tablespoon Flour
Pastry for double crust pie

Preparation:

In a saucepan, simmer saskatoon berries in water for 10 minutes. Add lemon juice. Stir in granulated sugar mixed with flour. Pour into pastry lined pie plate. Dot with butter. Cover with top crust; seal and flute edges.
Bake in 425F oven for 15 minutes; reduce heat to 350F oven and bake 35-45 minutes longer or until golden brown.

SOURCE: the sixties chapter, _A Century of Canadian Home Cooking_ by Carol Ferguson and Margaret Fraser

Scotch Barley Broth

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

2 pound Shoulder of mutton
1 cub Dried green peas
½ cub Pearl barley
2 quart Cold water
2 teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Pepper
2 Onions, chopped
3 Carrots, diced
1 cub Turnip, diced
½ cub Celery, diced
1 tablespoon Parsley, chopped

Preparation:

Soak green peas overnight and soak barley for 2 hours. Wipe meat and trim off fat. Put into broth pot with cold water, salt and pepper. Slowly bring to the boiling point and skim. Add peas, barley and onions and simmer gently for 2 hours. Cool then skim fat from broth. Bones may be removed if desired. Add carrots, turnip and celery and simmer 30 minutes until vegetables are tender. Season with more salt if needed and pepper to taste. Twenty minutes before serving, add parsley and remove any film of fat that has gathered on the surface.

Out of Old Nova Scotia Kitchens by Marie Nightingale shared by Elizabeth Rodier
Conf: (1010) F-COOKING
The book mentions Portable Soup (sometimes called Pocket Soup or Glue) that was made by simmering stock for 12 hours and then boiling/stirring constantly for 8. Then solid stock was formed into small cakes.
Sea-faring men and woodsmen could carry them in their pockets.

The Public Soup House in Halifax (spring 1818) distributed 100 gallons of soup daily made from 50 pounds of beef and vegetables.

Seafood Chowder

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 medium Onion; minced
1 tablespoon Butter
1 ½ teaspoon Thyme
1 ¼ teaspoon Celery salt
2 cub Whipping cream
9 ounce Haddock or halibut fillets
6 ounce Scallops; chopped
3 ounce Lobster meat; cooked &chopped
¾ cub Sour cream
3 Potatoes; peeled, cooked anddiced
1 ¼ cub Milk
1 teaspoon -salt
½ teaspoon -pepper
Paprika for garnish

Preparation:

"A traditional Atlantic chowder is made with fish or shellfish, canned milk, potatoes, onions and is served with a dollop of butter. This version, which comes from a Nova Scotia fisherman and uses sour cream, fresh cream and thyme, is quite different and very good.
When reheated leftover chowder, it may be necessary to add a little more milk or cream, because the fish and potatoes will have absorbed some of the liquid."

Cook the onion in the butter until transparent. Add the thyme and celery salt. Remove from heat.
In a saucepan, pour the whipping cream over the fish fillets.Cover, bring to a boil and simmer slowly for 10 minutes or till the fish flakes easily.
Remove the fish with a slotted spoon, then break into small pieces and remove any bones.
Add the onion mixture and the scallops to the poaching liquid. Bring to barely a boil, then simmer for about 1 minute or till the scallops are opaque. If the chowder is not to be eaten immediately, refrigerate everything at this stage.
Just before serving, add the fish, lobster, sour cream, potatoes and milk.
Heat through, but do not allow to boil. Season with salt and pepper.
Ladle into soup bowls. Sprinkle with paprika. Serve immediately.
SERVES: 4-6
from the Zwicker Inn, Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia

Source: _Across the Table:An Indulgent Look at Food in Canada_.

Singing Hinnies

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

4 cub Flour
2 teaspoon Sugar
1 teaspoon Baking soda
2 teaspoon Cream of tartar
1 pinch -salt
¼ cub Lard
¼ cub Margarine
1 ¼ cub Currants or currants andsultanas mixed
2 tablespoon Milk;or enough to makestiff dough

Preparation:

These are hotcakes from the isle of Cape Breton in Nova Scotia.

Mix flour, sugar, baking soda, cream of tartar and salt then rub in lard (I would use shortening) and margarine. Add currants and milk to make dough stiff enough to roll ¾" thick. Cut into thick rounds and bake on greased griddle or lightly greased electric pan set on low, until brown.
Turn and cook on the other side. Split and spread with butter and jam.

Source: _More Baking with Schmecks Appeal_

Skidaddle Cookies

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 cub Flour
1 teaspoon Baking soda
½ teaspoon Salt
¾ cub Butter
1 ½ cub Sugar, brown lightly packed
1 teaspoon Vanilla
1 Egg
1 cub Fruit cocktail, well drained
½ cub Walnuts

Preparation:

"Skidaddle Ridge, New Brunswick, came by its name because it was a hideout for draft dodgers. The "Skidaddlers were Democrats who, not in sympathy with the Republican Party during the Civil War; "skidaddled" out of the country. Most of them returned home after the war, but many stayed to settle in New Brunswick and Southern Ontario.

These cookies are frequently packed in the lunch boxes carried by hunters in this region."

Sift together the flour, baking soda and salt. Cream together the butter, brown sugar and vanilla. Beat in the egg and fruit cocktail. Stir in the dry ingredients and add the walnuts. Drop batter from a teaspoon about 2 inches about on a greased baking sheet. Bake in 350 oven for 10 to 12 minutes, or until golden brown.
MAKES: about 6 dozen
Source:_The Laura Secord Canadian Cookbook_

Smothered Muskrat and Onions

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 Muskrat
1 tablespoon -Salt
1 quart -Water; Canadian qt=5 cups
1 ½ teaspoon -Salt
¼ teaspoon Paprika
½ cub Flour
3 tablespoon Fat
3 large Onions; sliced
1 cub Sour cream

Preparation:

Skin and clean the muskrat, remove fat, scent glands and white tissue inside each leg.
Soak muskrat overnight in a weak brine solution of 1 Tbsp salt to 1 qt (Imperial qt = 5 cups) water. Drain, disjoint and cut up.
Put flour, salt & paprika in a paper bag. Add muskrat pieces and shake until each piece is well coated.
Melt fat in heavy fry pan, add the muskrat pieces and saute slowly until browned.
When meat is browned, cover with onions, sprinkle with salt and pepper and pour the cream over.
Cover fry pan and simmer for 1 hour.
SERVES: 4

SOURCE: _The Northern Cookbook_, Ministry of Supply and services, Canada

Soft Molasses Cookies

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub Sugar
1 cub Shortening
1 Egg
1 cub Molasses
1 cub Sour milk or buttermilk
4 ½ cub Flour
3 tablespoon Flour
4 teaspoon Baking soda
2 ½ teaspoon Ginger

Preparation:

Mix sugar, shortening, egg and molasses in bowl. Then mix flour, soda, salt and ginger together. Add milk & flour one after another; blend together. Drop by teaspoonfuls onto greased cookie sheets. Bake 7 minutes in 350F.
This recipe is from my grandmother in Nova Scotia's recipe box.

Soupe A L'ivrogne (drunkard's Soup)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

2 tablespoon Salted herbs
¼ pound Salt pork, cut into smallcubes
3 large Onions, chopped
6 slice White bread, cubed
8 cub Beef stock
Salt and ground black pepper

Preparation:

Servings: 8 to 10

Soak herbs in cold water, then drain. Fry salt pork until crisp and brown in a large, heavy frying pan. Add onions and saute until browned. Add bread cubes to the frying pan; toss to coat well. Place frying pan in a preheated 350 deg F oven for 15 minutes to toast bread lightly.

Transfer mixture to a large, heavy saucepan. Add beef stock and salted herbs. Simmer gently for 1 hour. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by: Linda Davis

Soupe Aux Pois Beauceons (pea Soup, Beauce Style)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

2 cub Dried white pea beans
2 tablespoon Butter
½ cub Onion, chopped
¼ cub Leek, chopped, white partonly
¼ cub Smoked ham, plus ham bone
½ pound Salt pork
1 Garlic clove
8 cub Cold water
2 tablespoon Salted herbs, rinsed in coldwater

Preparation:

Servings: 8

Soak peas for at least 8 hours or overnight in water to cover; drain. Heat butter in a large, heavy pot and saute onion and leek until tender. Add peas, ham, salt pork (in one piece), garlic, water and salted herbs. Bring quickly to a boil, lower heat, partly cover, and cook gently for 2 to 3 hours or until peas are tender. Stir occasionally during cooking, adding more water if necessary. Remove salt pork, cut in small pieces, then return to soup. May be frozen.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by : Linda Davis

Squamish Bars

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub Peanut butter
½ cub Brown sugar;packed
½ cub Corn syrup
1 cub Crisp rice cereal
1 cub Cornflakes

FILLING:
2 cub Icing sugar
¼ cub Butter;softened
2 tablespoon Light cream
1 ½ teaspoon Vanilla

TOPPING:
3 ounce Chocolate; bittersweet orsemisweet
1 tablespoon Butter

Preparation:

"British Columbia has more than one no-bake square named after one of its towns. The Squamish bar, peanutty and crisp with cereal, may be pretend to be a cookie, but, just like its cousin, the Nanaimo bar, it's really candy and should therefore be cut into very small squares and served as special treats." Anne's note:I do not know whether there really is a "Squamish bar" or if Canadian Living made this up.

In large saucepan over low heat, beat peanut butter, sugar and corn syrup until blended and sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat, stir in rice cereal and cornflakes. Press into lightly greased (" square cake pan; let cool.
Filling: In bowl, beat icing sugar and butter; beat in cream and vanilla.
Spread over cereal base, chill for 30 minutes.
Topping: In double boiler, over hot water, melt chocolate and butter, let cool. spread evenly over filling, chill for 20 minutes. Cut into squares.
(Can be refrigerated for up to 1 week or frozen up to 1 month. Let soften slightly before serving.)
MAKES: 36 SQUARES

Source: Canadian Living magazine

Strawberry Spinach Salad

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

½ cub Raspberry vinegar
½ cub Vegetable oil
1 cub -Water
3 Shallots; finely choppedfreshly ground black pepper
2 pint Strawberries;fresh ; 1 lbsliced
1 pound Spinach;fresh, trimmed(500g)

Preparation:

Les Frises Vinaigrette et Leurs Pousses Vertes

Strawberries need not be confined to dessert, says Denis Pelletier, chef at Restaurant Le Mouilin de St. Laurent on Ile d'Orleans. The island is one of the province's lushest strawberry-growing areas. The chef suggests serving this colourful salad with a semi-soft cheese as St. Nectaire.

Make a salad dressing by combining vinegar, oil and water. Add chopped shallots and pepper to taste. Arrange sliced strawberries in a spiral formation on the spinach and drizzle with the dressing.

SERVES:6

SOURCE: _A Taste of Quebec_ by Julian Armstrong

Sugar Pie - Hotel Paulin

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

Pastry for 9" pie
2 cub Brown sugar; packed
2 tablespoon Flour; all purpose
Salt; pinch
2 Eggs
1 Egg yolk
1 cub Milk
1 teaspoon Vanilla

Preparation:

Roll out pastry and fit into 9" pie plate, trim and flute edges. In bowl, blend sugar, flour and salt. In separate bowl using electric mixer, beat eggs and yolk till frothy; beat in milk and vanilla. Stir egg mixture into sugar mixture till smooth. Bake in 400F oven for 10 minutes; reduce to 350F and bake for about 35 minutes or till crust is golden brown and filling is set. Let cool on rack.

a French Canadian speciality
Source: Canadian Living magazine, the same recipe is called "Acadian Sugar Pie" in _Canadian Living's Country Cooking_

Tarte au Sucre Jaune (Brown Sugar Pie)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

1 cub Brown sugar
1 tablespoon Flour
1 tablespoon Butter
4 tablespoon Cream
Pie crust; uncooked

Preparation:

Mix the brown sugar, flour, butter and cream. Pour the mixture into an uncooked pie crust, covering the top with woven strips of pastry dough, if desired.
Bake at 400F for about 30 minutes.

SOURCE:_A Taste of Acadie_ by Marielle Cormier-Boudreau

The Mother Superior's Cabbage Salad

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 cub Cabbage; finely grated
1 Onion; small,minced
½ teaspoon -salt
2 Apples; red, unpeeled,grated
1 tablespoon Sugar
2 tablespoon Vinegar
¼ teaspoon -salt
¼ teaspoon -pepper
½ cub Sour cream;thick

Preparation:

La salade de choux de la Mere Superieure

From Mme Benoit, "The Mother Superior at the village convent would prepare this recipe from special guests. Many people still make this cabbage salad with sour cream."

Mix together in a large bowl, grated cabbage, minced onion, salt and grated apples.
Mix together sugar, vinegar, salt, pepper and thick sour cream.
Refrigerate the salad and dressing for 20 minutes before serving. Then pour the dressing over the cabbage, mix well, and salt for salt and vinegar.

Source:_My Grandmother's Kitchen_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

The Ultimate Butter Tart

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

Pastry for double crust pie
½ cub Brown sugar;lightly packed
½ cub Corn syrup
¼ cub Shortening;'golden' flavour
1 Egg; slightly beaten
1 teaspoon Vanilla
¼ teaspoon -Salt
¾ cub Raisins

Preparation:

Prepare pastry. Roll out thinly on floured surface. Cut into rounds with 4" round cutter. Fit into medium-sized muffin cups. Combine all ingredients except raisins; mix well. Put raisins into pastry shells, dividing evenly. Fill 2/3 full with syrup mixture. Bake on bottom shelf at 425F for 12 to 15 minutes or just until set. DON'T OVERBAKE. Overbaking makes them runnier! Cool on wire rack, then remove from pans.
SERVINGS: 12

Source: "Fabulous Favourites: Baking Festival Recipes" pamphlet; General Foods Canada

Toronto Pie

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

½ cub Milk; scalded, heated tillbubbles appear aroundedges
2 tablespoon Butter
1 cub Cake and pastry flour
1 ¼ teaspoon Baking powder
¼ teaspoon -Salt
2 Eggs
2/3 cub Granulated sugar
¼ teaspoon Vanilla
Raspberry jam
Icing sugar

Preparation:

"The Home Cook Book , published in Toronto in 1879, included a recipe for Toronto pie. Although continuing as a family favorite, the name slipped into disuse during the intervening years. A delicate, hot-milk sponge cake split and filled with raspberry jam, Toronto Pie belongs in the same family as Boston cream pie."
During my 30+ years living in Toronto, I have never heard of this cake.

Grease a 9 inch round layer cake pan and line with wax paper. Combine scalded milk and butter.

Sift or blend together flour, baking powder and salt. Beat 2 eggs until very light and fluffy. Gradually beat in granulated sugar and vanilla.

With mixer at high speed beat eggs and sugar for 1 minute. Fold in dry ingredients and then stir in hot milk mixture. Turn into prepared pan.
Bake in preheated 350F oven for 30 to 35 minutes or until cake springs back when lightly touched.

Cool in pan. When almost cool, loosen edges and remove from pan. Split into two layers, sandwich together with raspberry jam and sprinkle icing sugar on top.

MAKES: 1 CAKE
Source:_The Laura Secord Canadian Cookbook_

Tourtiere #2

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

2 pound Pork; ground
1 Onion; large
1 Garlic clove
⅛ teaspoon Mace; ground
⅛ teaspoon Sage; ground
1 Potato; small
¼ cub RaisinsPepper to tasteWater; boiling
Pastry for double crust pie

Preparation:

Finely mince onion and garlic. Peel and grate potatoes. Place pork, onion, garlic, mace, sage, grated potato and raisins in large heavy pot. Cover with boiling water, about 2 cups/ Cook, uncovered over medium hear or till meat is no longer pink and water is absorbed, 30 to 45 minutes. Stir frequently, reducing water if necessary to avoid boiling. Remove from heat and set aside to cool. Skim off excess fat. Preheat oven to 400F. Meanwhile prepare pastry. Line a pie plate with half of the pastry. Prick with fork and bake 10 minutes. Cool to room temperature. Pour cooled meat mixture into
pie shell. cover with top crust. Crimp and seal edges and cut vents to allow steam to escape. Bake 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350F and bake 30 more minutes or till crust is light brown and filling is bubbly. Serve hot.

Source: _Judith Comfort's Christmas CookBook_by Judith Comfort

Tourtiere #3

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

CRUST:
2 ½ cub Flour
2 teaspoon Baking powder
1 teaspoon -Salt
½ pound Shortening
½ cub -Hot water
2 teaspoon Lemon juice
1 Egg; well beaten

FILLING:
1 pound Pork; lean ground
1 Onion; finely chopped
½ teaspoon -Salt
¼ teaspoon -Pepper
½ teaspoon Thyme
½ teaspoon Sage
½ teaspoon Dry mustard
½ teaspoon Cloves
1 Potato; boiled & mashed

HERB SAUCE:
1 Celery stalk; minced
2 ½ cub Consomme
½ teaspoon Sage
½ teaspoon Thyme
¼ cub Butter
½ cub Flour
1 tablespoon Parsley
1 cub Mushrooms; chopped

Preparation:

For Crust: Combine flour, baking powder and salt in large mixing bowl.
Measure in 2/3 cup cold shortening and cut into flour till mealy.
Completely dissolve remaining ½ cup shortening in hot water (heat as necessary to dissolve). Cool. Add lemon juice and egg to water-shortening mixture. Mix liquid into flour mixture till dough leaves the sides of the bowl. Turn out onto lightly floured board and knead for about 1 minutes or till all flour is blended. Wrap in waxed paper, refrigerate for 1 to 12 hours. Roll out 2/3 of the dough and line a casserole dish. Reserve 1/3 for top crust.

For Filling: Simmer meat and ½ cup water for 45 minutes. Add onion and seasonings and simmer for 15 minutes. Mix in mashed potatoes and cool.
Place in bottom crust, top with remaining dough and slit crust. Bake at 400F for 30 minutes.

For sauce: Simmer all ingredients except for flour, parsley and mushrooms for 1 hour. Add to sauce and stir till thickened, then add parsley and mushrooms Simmer for 10 minutes. Serve with tortiere.

Source: Harrowsmith Cookbook vol.3

Tourtiere A La Ouananiche (lac St-jean Salmon Pie)

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

2 tablespoon Butter
1 medium Onion, thinly sliced
1 large Potato, peeled, thinlysliced
1 pound Ouananiche or salmon, cutinto small pieces
Salt and ground white pepper
¼ cub Milk
2 tablespoon Light cream
1/3 cub Water (approximate)
1 Egg, beaten with 1 Tb milk
Pastry for double crust pie

Preparation:

Servings: 6

Line a 9-inch pie plate with pastry. Heat butter in frying pan and saute onion until soft but not browned. Add potatoes, fish, salt, pepper, milk and cream; mix gently so as not to break up the pieces of fish. Arrange mixture evenly in the pastry shell. Gently stir in water; it should come halfway up the fish mixture. Cover with top crust, trim, crimping edge to seal. Cut a small hole in the centre. Brush pastry with the beaten egg and milk.

Bake in a preheated 375 deg F oven to 45 to 50 minutes or until crust is browned.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by: Linda Davis

Tourtiere De Quebec (quebec Pork Pie)

Servings: 6

Ingredients:

1 ¼ pound Ground pork
½ To ¾ cup cold water
½ cub Onion, finely chopped
¼ cub Celery, finely chopped
½ teaspoon Ground black pepper
1 Bay leaf
½ teaspoon Dried savoury
¼ teaspoon Dried rosemary
¼ teaspoon Grated nutmeg
Pinch cinnamon
Salt
¼ cub Old-fashioned rolled oats
Pastry for double crust pie

Preparation:

This is considered Quebec style, using rolled oats instead of potatoes to thicken the filling shows a Scottish influence.

Servings: 6

In a large, heavy frying pan, combine pork with cold water and heat to boiling point. Add onion, celery, pepper, bay leaf, savoury, rosemary, nutmeg and cinnamon. Cook, covered, over medium-low heat for 1 ½ hours, adding more water if mixture dries out. Halfway through cooking time, season with salt to taste. Stir in rolled oats and cook, stirring, for 1 to 2 minutes. Remove bay leaf.

Meanwhile, line a 9-inch pie plate with pastry. When meat mixture is lukewarm, spoon into pie shell and cover with remaining pastry. Trim pastry, seal edges and cut steam vents in top crust. Decorate with pastry cutouts as desired. Bake in preheated 425 deg F oven for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 375 deg F and bake another 25 minutes or until crust is golden.

Source: A Taste of Quebec by Julian Armstrong Posted by: Linda Davis

Veau Dans Le Chaudron ( Veal Pot Roast)

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

3 tablespoon Bacon fat or salad oil
2 Garlic cloves, cut in half
1 Veal - ½ leg or:3 or 4 lb rolled shoulderof veal
1 teaspoon Salt
¼ teaspoon Pepper
¼ teaspoon Thyme OR:
½ teaspoon Savory
1 Bay leaf
6 Potatoes - medium (6-8)
6 Onions - medium (6-8)

Preparation:

Melt or heat bacon fat or oil in cast iron saucepan. Stuff the 2 cloves of garlic, cut in two, into incisions made in the veal. Place the meat in the hot fat and brown well on all sides. Don't rush this as the colour and flavour of the finished gravy will depend on how well the meat has been browned. Add the thyme or savory and the bay leaf. Place the potatoes and onions, whole around the meat. Don't add any liquid. Cover tightly and cook over medium heat till meat is tender, about 2 hours. The potatoes and onions will not break as there is no liquid added. The veal will make its own gravy. When cooked, remove the meat from the pan to a heated platter.
Place the pan over high heat and stir gently, so as not to break up the vegetables. When they are well coated with gravy, boil another minutes or so till the gravy has a nice consistency. This is a complete meal.

from the Quebec section of _The Canadiana Cookbook_ by Mme. Jehane Benoit

Whitney Pot Roast

Servings: 1

Ingredients:

4 pound Moose steaks; ½ lb each
4 large Onions; sliced
½ cub Wine vinegar
1 can Tomato paste; small , 5 ½fluid oz, 156 mlWater, equal amount tothe tomato paste
Salt, pepper & paprika
½ cub Butter; or oil
2 Garlic cloves; minced
1 tablespoon Pickling spices; tied in abag
3 Bay leaves

Preparation:

Place steaks in cold water overnight. The next day, pat dry and season with salt, pepper and paprika. In a skillet, quickly brown steaks with butter or oil. Remove meat from skillet and set aside. Saute onion and garlic until transparent and add remaining ingredients. Place meat in heavy roast pan and pour onion mixture over it. Cover and cook in a 350F oven for 2 hours or until meat is tender. Remove spice bag and bay leaves.
Thicken liquid with flour and water. Serve.

SOURCE: _The Rural and Native Heritage Cookbook_ by Lovesick Lake Native Women's Association

Wild Rice With Mushrooms

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

½ cub Wild rice
1 1/3 cub -Water; cold
1 teaspoon Chicken bouillon
2 Bacon slice
½ cub Mushrooms; sliced
2 tablespoon Green onion
Thyme; dried
Parsley; snipped

Preparation:

Pour cold rice over rice in strainer and lift rice with fingers (to remove any impurities). Combine rice and 1 1/3 cups water and bouillon. Bring to a boil, reduce heat. Cover and simmer 60 minutes.* Meanwhile cook bacon partially and add mushrooms, green onion and thyme. Cook till bacon is crisp and mushrooms soft. Drain off fat. Add to cooked rice. Season with pepper. Sprinkle with chopped parsley. Time consuming and expensive. Be prepared to give wild rice as much cooking time as possible, occasionally it will require a bit more time as it absorbs water more slowly than regular rice.
Source: Canadian govt publication