Recipes

"English" Muffins (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 pound All-purpose or bread flour
1 teaspoon Salt
1 ½ tablespoon Dry yeast
1 teaspoon Sugar
8 fluid ounce Warm milk and water
2 ounce Butter, melted

Preparation:

(Note: Over here, and in England, these are just called "muffins", and are the ones in the song about the Muffin Man who lives in Drury Lane.
They did actually sell them door-to-door every morning in London until the turn of the century or thereabouts.)
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Sift the flour and salt into a bowl and leave in a warm place. Dissolve the yeast and sugar in ¼ pt of the warm milk and water. Leave to froth, then mix in the fat. Stir all the liquid into the warm flour and beat well until smooth and elastic. Cover and prove in a warm place for 50 minutes or until doubled in bulk. Turn onto a well-floured board and knead, working a little more flour if necessary to make the dough easier to shape. Round up the dough, roll into a thick sausage shape and (using the sharpest knife you have) slice into 8 to 10 portions, each about 1 ½ ~ 1 ¾ inch thick. Shape each one into a round with straight sides. Put onto a greased baking sheet. Cover (I use greased plastic wrap) and put in a warm place to prove for 30-40 minutes or until springy to the touch.
Leave room for expansion and be careful not to over-prove, as the muffins will get flabby and lose their shape. Warm and grease the bakestone lightly. Lift the muffins carefully onto the bakestone and cook over very moderate heat for 8-10 minutes until pale gold underneath. Turn and cook the other side. Wrap in a cloth and keep warm if cooking in batches. To serve, insert a knife in the side, pull the top and bottom slightly apart, and insert slivers of butter.
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These are strongly recommended. The taste of them hot off the bakestone, griddle or frying pan makes Thomas's look very poor indeed by comparison.

Apple And Potato Cake (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

1 ½ pound Floury potatoes
3 teaspoon Salt
2 ounce Butter
4 tablespoon Self-raising flour
2 Apples, peeled,cored,chopped
2 tablespoon Granulated sugar
3 tablespoon Softened butter

Preparation:

The potatoes must be hot and floury, but either eating apples or cooking apples can be used. (Best results with a cooking apple, though.) -- Boil the peeled potatoes in well-salted water. Drain and cover with a cloth to "dry in their steam". Sieve or rice into a warmed mixing bowl, and beat in the fat. Work in sufficient flour to make the dough manageable, adding salt to taste. Divide the dough in half and roll or pat into 2 rounds of equal size just over ½ inch thick. Place one round on the warmed bakestone and spread with the chopped apple. Cover with the other round of dough and pinch the edges together. -- Bake on the bakestone over a moderate heat until brown underneath. Turn using the broadest spatula you have, or two spatulas and a friend. Cook the other side. Remove the cake to a hot serving dish. Carefully peel up one side of the top of the cake, spread the apples with the softened butter, and sprinkle them with sugar.
Fold that half down and do the same to the other side. Sprinkle sugar on top, and serve immediately, with thick cool cream.

Buttered Oranges

Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients:

5 Oranges; large, juicy
4 tablespoon Sugar
6 Egg yolks
2 tablespoon Sherry
1 teaspoon Rosewater; optional
4 ounce Butter; ½ cup
1 cub Heavy cream
Crystallized violets;fordecoration, optional

Preparation:

"A recipe for Buttered Oranges can be found in Ann Blendcowe's cookery book published in 1694; they are also sometimes referred to as Nell Gwynn's Buttered Oranges, as she was believed to have served them to Charles II. Buttered Oranges are delicious, and they look spectacular."

To prepare the Orange Shells: Hold the orange so the stalk (or navel) is at the base and using a small knife cut off the top about two inches down. Scoop out all the flesh, being carefully not to break the skin. This can be done quite easily with a teaspoon. Using a pair of scissors, cut off the stalk that remains in the bottom, wash the orange and set it aside (the top can be discarded). Repeat this procedure with three more of the oranges. Grate the peel off the remaining orange and then squeeze the juice from this orange into the bowl. Place the flesh you have extracted from the other oranges in the sieve and squeeze the juice in the same bowl. Mix the juice with the sugar and egg yolks in a double boiler over low heat. Beat with a wire whisk until the mixture begins to thicken. Remove the top of the double boiler and cool in a bowl of cold water while you continue to stir; then add the sherry and rosewater. Remove the bowl from the cold water. Cut the butter into 1-inch cubes and mash it into the mixture piece by piece. Add the orange peel. Whip ¾ of the cream and fold it into the mixture. Pour the mixture into the four orange shells and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Before serving, place three crystallized violets on the top of each orange; whip the remaining cream and force it through a pastry tube in a curly pattern around the top edges. SERVES:4

SOURCE:_Great British Cooking: A Well Kept Secret_

Clotted Cream

Servings: 8 servings

Ingredients:

20 fluid ounce Heavy whipping cream
2 quart Milk (or more)*

Preparation:

*Preferably extra-rich milk, if you can get it in your area. -- Choose a wide-mouthed bowl or stainless steel bowl with sloping sides. Fill it with milk, leaving a deep enough rim free to avoid spillage. Add 20 fl double cream. Leave in the refrigerator for at least several hours, and preferably overnight. Set the bowl over a pan of water kept at 82 degrees C (180 F) and leave until the top of the milk is crusted with a nubbly yellowish-cream surface. This will take at least 1 ½ hours, but it is prudent to allow much longer.
Take the bowl from the pan and cool it rapidly in a bowl of ice water, then store in the refrigerator until very cold. Take the crust off with a skimmer, and put it into another bowl with a certain amount of the creamy liquid underneath; it is surprising how much the clotted part firms up -- it needs the liquid. You can now put the milk back over the heat for a second crust to form, and add that in its turn to the first one. The milk left over makes the most delicious rice pudding, or can be used in baking, especially of yeast buns. .
-- from Jane Grigson's OBSERVER GUIDE TO BRITISH COOKERY

Cornish Pasty

Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients:

1 pound Rump, chuck, or skirt steak
5 ounce Onion, chopped
3 ounce Turnip (swede), chopped
8 ounce Potato, peeled, sliced thin
Salt, pepper, thyme

Preparation:

"Make a firm pastry and roll out two dinner-plate circles, or four side-plate circles, according to whether you are feeding two ravenous people or four of moderate appetite. Leave to chill, while you prepare the filling.

"Cut all skin and gristle from the meat, and chop it. There should be at least 10 oz of skirt, and rather more of better quality steak.

"Season and layer the filling ingredients to one side of the pastry circles. Or mix them together (traditions differ). Brush edges with egg:
flip over the pastry to form a half-moon shape, and twist the edges to give a rope effect. Mark initials on the pastys, if you have varied the filling, in one corner. Brush over with egg and make two small holes at the top for steam to escape. Bake at 400F for 20 minutes, then lower the heat to 350F for a further 40 minutes.
Protect the pastry with butter papers or foil if they brown too fast.

"...The pasty -- pronounced with a long ah as in Amen -- is Cornwall's most famous and most travestied dish. Admittedly in times of poverty, its contents might be reduced to potatoes, or to parsley and an egg with a leek or two or a hint of bacon, but surely it never tasted as awful as the so-called Cornish pasties sold all over the country in supermarkets and cheap restaurants. The pastry obviously had to be firm, because pasties were a packed lunch, for carrying to the mines, fishing boats or schools (though not so hard that the pasty could be dropped down a mineshaft without breaking -- an old joke).

"At home, whatever might be put in a pasty on a working day, might come to the table in the form of a double-crust plate pie, or even without pastry at all -- steak, topped by turnip and potato, being layered into a pot and baked in the oven, a dish known as meat'n'under, or under roast.

"Whatever other people do to it, the Cornish keep their love of pasties; and all over the world, where Cornish miners have gone to find work, you are likely to find pasties. In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, for example, other ethnic groups have taken to the pasty, and you get Finnish or Italian versions as well as the original Cornish kind. They even keep the Cornish habit of marking initials on a corner of the crust, so that a half-eaten pasty can be left on a school bench, for example, and reclaimed by its owner after a fight or a game. And so that each individual in a family can have the variation of filling that he or she likes best."

(recipe and quote from THE OBSERVER GUIDE TO BRITISH COOKERY, Jane Grigson)

Cornish Pasty II (Variations)

Servings: 8 servings

Ingredients:

The below are from CORNISH RECIPES, ANCIENT AND MODERN, a pamphlet
cookbook issued by the Cornwall Federation of Women's Institutes.
(The copy I have is dated 1959: the first edition was published in
April 1929: this edition is the 20th.)

Preparation:

MEAT AND POTATO PASTY

Always use fresh steak, potatoes cut small, salt and pepper, flavored with onion.

RABBITTY PASTY

Use fleshy part of rabbit cut the same as meat, fairly small.

TURNIP PASTY

Turnips and potatoes, sometimes all turnip with a lump of butter or cream.
Or far bacon may be used.

MACKEREL PASTY

Allow one to two mackerel to each pasty, and clean and boil them in the usual way. Then remove skin and bones, and lay on pastry: fill up with washed parsley, and add pepper and salt.

HERBY PASTY

Prepare pastry as for ordinary pasty. Well wash equal quantities of parsley, bits [an unidentifiable local herb found only in North Cornwall], shallots, half quantity spinach, prepare some slices of bacon cut into small pieces and an egg well beaten. Pour boiling water over the parsley, bits and spinach that have been cut into small portions, and let stand for half an hour, well squeeze all moisture out. Put on pastry with the shallots cut finely and the bacon, pinch up the edges of pasty allowing a small portion left open for the egg to be added, finish pinching and bake.

STAR-GAZING PASTY

[A variant on another famous Cornish dish, "Stargazy Pie", in which the fish heads look out at you from under the pie crust, around the edges of the pie.]

"Mawther used to get a herring, clean 'un, and put same stuffin' as what yow do have in mabiers (chicken); sew 'un up with niddle and cotton, put 'en in some daugh made of suet and flour; pinch the daugh up in the middle and lave the heid sticking out one end, and tail t'other. They was some nice pasties, too, cooked in a fringle fire with crock and brandis and old furzy tobs."

Other variants also mentioned (essentially, just cut the ingredients up and put them in the pasty): apple with cinnamon and brown sugar (and sometimes blackberries as well): broccoli; chicken; dates; jam; pork; rice; parsley and lamb.

The cookbook also notes: "It is said that the Devil has never crossed the Tamar into Cornwall, on account of the well-known habit of Cornishwomen of putting everything they met into a pasty, and he was not sufficiently courageous to risk such a fate." And they quote the well-known poem which describes the basic pasty structure:

"Pastry rolled out like a plate,
Piled with 'turmut, tates, and mate',
Doubled up and baked like fate,
That's a 'Cornish Pasty'."

Drop Scones (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

4 ounce Self-raising flour
2 tablespoon Granulated sugar
1 Egg, beaten
5 fluid ounce Milk*

Preparation:

*Approximate. -- Sift the flour into a mizing bowl and mix in the sugar.
Make a well in the center of the flour and drop in the egg. Stir in the milk gradually and mix to a creamy batter. The thicker the batter, the thicker the pancake will be. Heat the bakestone and grease lightly.
Using a large spoon, drop the batter off it in round "puddles" onto the bakestone, leaving room for spreading. Cook over a moderate heat until the top surface is covered with bubbles, and when the underside is golden, turn and cook the other side. When golden, lift off the bakestone and wrap in a cloth. Serve as soon as possible with butter, honey and preserves. If any are left until the next day, they can be crisped under the grill before serving. For a change, 1 oz of butter can be rubbed into the flour and sugar: or lemon essence (six drops) can be added to the batter.

English Crumpets (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

4 ounce All-purpose flour
4 ounce Bread flour
2 teaspoon Salt
¼ ounce Fresh yeast
1 teaspoon Sugar
½ pint Warm milk and water
1 tablespoon Vegetable oil
½ teaspoon Bicarbonate of soda
¼ pint Warm water

Preparation:

Sift the flours and salty into a warm bowl. Cream the yeast with the sugar. Add the warmed milk and water, then the oil. Stir into the flour to make a batter, and beat vigorously until smooth and elastic. Cover the bowl, put in a warm place and leave it until the mixture rises and the surface is full of bubbles (about 1 ½ hours). Break it down by beating with a wooden spoon. Cover and leave in a warm place to prove for another 30 minutes. -- To cook the crumpets, heat and grease the bakestone lightly. Grease 5 or 6 crumpet rings (3-3 ½ inches) (or scone cutters) and put them on the bakestone to heat. Cook as many crumpets as possible at a time, as the batter will not stay bubbly for long. -- Put ½ inch deep of batter into each ring. Cook gently for 7 - 10 minutes, or until the surface sets and is full of tiny bubbles. Using an oven glove for protection, lift off the ring, and if the base of the crumpet is pale gold, flip it over and cook for another 3 minutes until the other side is just colored. If the crumpet batter is set but sticks slightly in the ring, push it out gently with the back of a wooden spoon. Wipe, grease and heat the rings for each batch of crumpets. If serving immediately, wrap the crumpets in a cloth and keep warm between batches. Butter generously and serve at once. If reheating, toast the crumpets under the grill, cooking the smooth surface first and then the top so that the butter will melt into the holes.

Fred's Hottest Shrimp ****

Servings: 1 servings

Ingredients:

1 pound Medium Shrimp, Shelled And Deveined, Shells Reserved
½ cub Water
2 teaspoon Tabasco Pepper Sauce
1 tablespoon Catsup
1 teaspoon Salt
1 ½ teaspoon Sugar
pinch White Pepper
4 tablespoon Olive Oil
1 small Green Pepper, Cut Into ½-Inch Cubes
1 small Red Pepper, Cut Into ½-Inch Cubes
4 Minced Garlic Cloves
½ cub Diced Onion
1 tablespoon White Wine

Preparation:

Fred Ferretti, who writes a regular column in Gourmet magazine, is rumored to carry a flask of Tabasco sauce on his hip. He insists this is an exaggeration, but he has been known to shake droplets of the pepper sauce even on dim sum. Here's his recipe for shrimp with a real kick.
~--------------------------------------------------------------------- ~-- In a small saucepan, combine the shrimp shells with the water and boil for 10 minutes. Remove the shells and reserve the stock. In a small bowl, combine 1 tablespoon of the shrimp stock with the Tabasco sauce, catsup, salt and sugar; set aside. Heat 1-½ tablespoons of oil, add the bell peppers and saute for 1 minute, then remove the peppers and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and add the remaining 2-½ tablespoons oil and the garlic and onion. Cook over high heat for about 4 minutes, or until the onion is softened and translucent.
Stir in the shrimp and cook for 1 minute. Add the wine and mix well.
The shrimp should begin to curl. Add the reserved peppers and stir, cooking for about 30 seconds. Stir the Tabasco sauce mixture and pour it into the skillet, mixing all ingredients thoroughly. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer the shrimp with the sauce to a warmed serving dish. Serve immediately with cooked rice.

From: The Tabasco Cookbook.

Groaty Dick Pudding

Servings: 1 servings

Ingredients:

Stewing beef; cubedsmall amount
Onions; chopped
Leeks; choppedSalt & Pepperomit salt if using bouillon
Oat groats; if you can't getat health food store, trypet store
Stock; homemade, preferable

Preparation:

A traditional Midlands dish.

Put meat (do not brown first) , onions, leeks, salt & pepper and groats in earthenware pot. Pour stock over top and stir. Put lid on.
Put in medium-low oven for 16 hours. Groats will absorb stocks and juices and expand.

SOURCE: "Floyd on Britain" TV show

Honey And Cream Scones (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

6 ounce Whole wheat flour
6 ounce Plain flour
2 teaspoon Bicarbonate of soda
1 teaspoon Cream of tartar
1 ounce Butter
5 fluid ounce Sour cream
4 ounce Clear honey
1 Egg
Milk for glazing

Preparation:

Sift the flour, soda, and cream of tartar into a mixing bowl. Cut the fat into the flour and rub it to a breadcrumb consistency. Miz the sour cream and honey together until the honey is dissolved. Beat in the egg. Make a well in the flour, pour in the liquid and mix to a soft dough. Turn onto a floured board and knead in a little extra flour if necessary. Roll out ½ inch thick and cut into rounds with a 2-inch cutter. Lift onto a heated and greased bakestone and brush the tops of the scones with a little milk.
Cook until the underside is golden, then turn and cook the other side.
Serve hot, split and spread with butter and honey: or serve cold with butter or clotted cream.

Hot Chocolate Souffles

Servings: 6 servings

Ingredients:

9 ounce Semisweet chocolate, chopped
4 each Lg Egg yolks
2 tablespoon Dark rum
1 tablespoon Unsalted butter, melted
6 each Lg Egg whites
1 pinch Cream of tartar

Preparation:

In the top of a double boiler set over simmering water, melt the chocolate, stirring, until it is smooth. Remove the pan from the heat, add the egg yolks, one at a time, whisking well after each addition, and whisk in the rum and butter. Transfer mixture to a large bowl.
In a bowl with an electric mixer, beat the egg whites with the cream of tartar and a pinch of salt until they hold stiff peaks. Stir a quarter of the egg whites into the chocolate mixture then fold in the remaining egg whites gently but thoroughly. Spoon the mixture into 6 buttered 2/3 cup souffle dishes and bake them on a baking sheet in the middle of a preheated 400f oven for 10-12 minutes, or until they are puffed and a tester comes out nearly clean.
a 1982 Gourmet Mag. favorite from Homewood Park, a small hotel and restaurant in Bath, England

Oatcakes (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

4 ounce Medium oatmeal*
½ teaspoon Salt
1 pinch Bicarbonate of soda
2 tablespoon Melted bacon fat**
2 fluid ounce Hot water***

Preparation:

*Grinding down regular rolled oats slightly in a blender or grinder will be a help. **Or beef dripping. ***Approximately. -- Mix the oatmeal, salt and soda in a bowl. Make a well in the center. Pour in the melted fat and add enough water to make a stiff dough which can be squeezed into a ball. Sprinkle the board and your hands with oatmeal and knead the mixture until there are no cracks in it. Flatten the ball and roll it out into a round just under ¼ inch thick. Invert a plate on top and trim off the ragged edges -- these can be added to the next batch of dough to be rolled. Cut the round into quarters, lift them onto a warmed and greased bakestone and cook over moderate heat for 20 minutes or until the triangles curl at the corners. Turn and cook the other side for 5 minutes, or finish under a moderate grill. Store the oatcakes in an airtight tin, and toast under a moderate grill, or in the oven, before serving. -- These are served with honey, marmalade or jam for breakfast, or with crowdie (a slightly sweet Highland Scots cottage cheese) for tea.
They are especially good with fried herring or smoked haddock. Not to mention any kind of caviar you can get your hands on.

Pikelets (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

8 ounce Plain or unbleached flour
1 teaspoon Salt
½ ounce Fresh yeast*
1 teaspoon Sugar
5 fluid ounce Warm water
1 teaspoon Butter
5 fluid ounce Warm milk
1 Egg, beaten

Preparation:

*Or 1 ½ t dried yeast. -- These are similar to crumpets -- they are made with a yeast batter, but cooked without rings. -- Sift the flour and salt into a warm bowl. Dissolve the yeast and the sugar in the warm water. Melt the butter in the warm milk and beat in the egg. Stir the yeast liquid and then the milk mixture into the flour. Mix into a smooth batter and beat well. Cover and leave in a warm place for 1 to 1 ½ hours, until the batter is thick and bubbling. Warm the bakestone and grease with a piece of lard on a fork (use a piece of fat back if you're short of lard). When a drop of water sputters on the bakestone, it's hot enough. Stir the batter, then use a ladle or a jug to pour it onto the bakestone in round "puddles|, leaving space in between so that the pikelets will be easy to turn. The yeast batter will not spread as much as pancake batter. Cook over a moderate heat until bubbles break the top surface and the underneath is pale gold. Flip over the pikelets and cook the other side until honey-colored. Keep wach batch warm in a folded cloth in a low oven. Serve with butter, honey or preserves, or for a savory dish, with cream cheese or grilled bacon, or little sausages. To reheat, crisp under the grill.

Poor Knights of Windsor

Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients:

2 cub Raspberries
3 tablespoon Confectioners' sugar
1 cub Heavy cream
½ cub Sherry
3 Egg yolks; lightly beaten
6 slice Bread; up to 8crusts remove, cut intriangles
3 ounce Butter; 6 Tbsp
1 teaspoon Cinnamon

Preparation:

"I have never found out the origin of this recipe or where its name comes from. However, it is particularly pleasant because of the contrast between the hot toasted bread (which is similar to the French toast) and the cold raspberries and cream."

Sprinkle the raspberries with confectioner's sugar, crush them gently with a fork and set aside. Whip the cream until it is stiff. Place the sherry in one bowl and the lightly beaten egg yolks in another.
Dip the bread slices first in the sherry and then in the egg yolks.
Melt the butter in a frying pan and when it is hot, fry the bread on both sides until it is golden brown. Transfer the slices to a warm dish and sprinkle each side with a little cinnamon. Place a few of the raspberries on each slice of the toasted bread and cover with a dollop of cream. SERVES: 4-6

SOURCE: _Great British Cooking: A Well Kept Secret_

Potato Cakes (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

1 pound Cooked floury potatoes
1 teaspoon Salt
2 ounce Butter, softened
4 tablespoon Self-raising flour
1 Butter for filling

Preparation:

Potato cakes are eaten with bacon and sausages. It's easier to make them with hot, freshly cooked potatoes. If using cold potatoes, melt the butter before adding it. Choose a floury type of potato, and boil in well-salted water. -- Drain the cooked potatoes well, then return to low heat in the same pan: put a dishcloth over the pan and allow the potatoes to dry for 5-10 minutes. (This is called "drying in their steam" in Ireland.) They should be dry and floury at the end of the process. Sieve or rice into a mixing bowl with the salt. Beat in the butter. Work in sufficient flour to make a soft dough which is easy to handle. Turn onto a floured board and roll or pat out to ¾ inch thick. Cut into rounds with a 3-inch scone cutter. Place on the hot greased bakestone and cook over a moderate heat until golden brown underneath. Turn and cook the other side. Remove from the bakestone, split, butter generously, and close again. Keep warm while cooking the next batch. Serve hot. (Re "self-raising flour": in Ireland and the UK, this is flour which comes with baking powder/baking soda already included. For this recipe, about ¼-½ t of baking powder mixed with a plain all-purpose flour will substitute nicely.)

STEAK & KIDNEY PIE

Servings: 1 servings

Ingredients:

1 Kidney, beef
4 tablespoon Shortening
2 Onion; chopped
2 pound Round steak; cubed
1 ½ tablespoon Worcester sauce
½ teaspoon Salt
½ teaspoon Pepper
2 tablespoon Butter; softened
2 tablespoon Flour
2 tablespoon Parsley; minced
1 teaspoon Rosemary
1 teaspoon Oregano

pastry:
1 cub Flour; + 2 t
¼ teaspoon Salt
1/3 cub Shortening
2 tablespoon ;water, cold

Preparation:

Wash the kidney, remove membranes and fat, and cut kidney in 1" cubes. Cube the steak into 1" cubes. Melt the shortening in a heavy pot. Add the onions and cook, stirring often, until well browned. Add the steak and kidneys. When the meat is browned on all sides, pour on 2 cups of boiling water, Worcester, salt, and pepper. Cove and cook over a very low heat for 1 ½ hours, or until the steak is tender. Preheat the oven to 400 F. Blend the butter with the flour to make a beurre manie. Drop small pellets of this paste into the sauce and stir to thicken it. Put meat and sauce into a deep pie plate and sprinkle with parsley. If you wish to use a pastry topping, roll out the dough and cover the pie plate. Slash the top, crimp the edges, and bake about 30 minutes, or until well browned. Pastry: Mix the flour and salt. Cut in the shortening with a pastry blender. Combine lightly only until the mixture resembles coarse meal or very tine peas; its texture will not be uniform but will contain crumbs and small bits and pieces. Sprinkle water over the flour mixture, a tablespoon at a time, and mix lightly with a fork, using only enough water so that the pastry will hold together when pressed gently into a ball.

--- Fannie Farmer Cookbook

Swedish Flatbread (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 8

Ingredients:

8 ounce Ground wholemeal flour
8 ounce Rye or barley flour
1 teaspoon Salt
8 fluid ounce Lukewarm water*

Preparation:

*You may need as much as 12 fl total. -- Blend the flours together with the salt. Mix in sufficient water to bind together into a dough -- the quantity will depend on the types of flour used. -- Beat until dough leaves the sides of the bowl, then turn onto a floured board and knead thoroughly. Heat the bakestone over a moderate heat and grease it.
Divide the dough into four and roll one quarter out into a round as thin as possible. Using a plate about 8 inches wide, trim the edges into a neat circle. Prick all over to prevent the dough bubbling while cooking.
~- Transfer to the bakestone and cook over a moderate heat for about 15 minutes, or until slightly colored. Then turn and cook the other side.
Repeat with the rest of the dough, working up the trimmings for re-shaping and baking. -- Cool on a wire tray. When cold, store in an airtight container. (Danish-butter-cookie containers, the big ones, are good for this.)

Teisin Lap (plate Cake) (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

8 ounce Plain flour
2 teaspoon Baking powder
½ teaspoon Grated nutmeg
2 ounce Butter
2 ounce Lard
4 ounce Soft brown sugar
4 ounce Mixed dried fruit
2 Eggs, beaten
¼ pint Cream, or buttermilk

Preparation:

Sift the flour, baking powder and nutmeg into a mixing bowl. Cut the fat into the flour and rub it to a breadcrumb-like consistency. Mix in the sugar and dried fruit. Stir in the eggs, and sufficient cream or buttermilk to make a soft dough. Roll out to 1 inch thick, cut into 2 ½-inch rounds. Cook on a warmed greased bakestone for about 15 minutes on each side.

Toad in the Hole

Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients:

HOLE": BATTER MIXTURE:
4 ounce Plain white flour
2 Small eggs
½ teaspoon Salt
10 fluid ounce Milk

TOAD": SAUSAGES:
4 100% pork sausages

Preparation:

Essentially, this dish is Yorkshire pudding with sausages in it.

Preheat the oven to 450F. Saute the sausages briefly in a pan to draw off excess fat. Reserve this. Cut the sausages into chunks.

Put the fat in a small roasting pan (a metal 9X9 cake pan is perfect): add a little oil, if necessary, to bring the amount of fat up to about 4 tablespoons. Heat the fat, either in a hot oven or on the stove, until smoking hot. Meanwhile, prepare the batter mixture.
When the pan and fat are *very* hot, pour in the batter mixture, scatter the sausage chunks onto it, and put the whole business into the hot oven. Bake for about 5-10 minutes at 450F, then reduce to 400F and bake until the Yorkshire pudding around the sausages has puffed up nicely and is a deep golden brown. This may take as long as 30 minutes or as little as 20: keep an eye on it. Serve immediately when done. Warning: the pudding will deflate if kept waiting.

Variants on this dish can be made with chunks of leftover roast beef, or almost any kind of meat, just so that you alter the cooking time to take into account whether the meat being used has already been cooked adequately when it goes into the pudding.

Also: some people like to add a little beer to the pudding mixture.

(Adapted from the description of Toad in the Hole in Jane Grigson's OBSERVER GUIDE TO BRITISH COOKERY)

TRIFLE

Servings: 12 servings

Ingredients:

SPONGE CAKE:
2 Eggs; separated
1 cub Sugar
6 tablespoon Hot water
¼ teaspoon Lemon extract
1 cub Flour
1 ½ teaspoon Baking powder
¼ teaspoon Salt

BOILED CUSTARD:
3 Eggs
¼ cub Sugar
⅛ teaspoon Salt
2 cub Milk; scalded
½ teaspoon Vanilla

TRIFLE:
1 pound Raspberry jam
4 cub Strawberries washed and hulled
Sugar
6 tablespoon Sweet sherry
1 cub Whipping cream; whipped
Slivered almonds

Preparation:

Beat 2 egg yolks until thick and lemon-colored. Add ½ cup sugar gradually and continue beating. Slowly add hot water, then add remaining ½ cup sugar and lemon extract. Beat 2 egg whites until stiff and fold in. Sift flour with baking powder and ¼ teaspoon salt and add. Turn batter into ungreased 9-inch square cake pan and bake at 350F 25 minutes. Invert pan on rack and let stand until cake is cold. Loosen with spatula and carefully remove cake from pan.

Meanwhile, to make custard, beat 3 eggs lightly. Add ¼ cup sugar and ⅛ teaspoon salt. Add milk, stirring constantly. Cook, stirring, in top of double boiler over hot, not boiling, water until mixture coats spoon, about 7 to 10 minutes. Add vanilla and cool.

To assemble trifle, slice cake in halves horizontally. Spread each half with jam. Cut in 1-inch cubes. Reserve a few strawberries for garnish and slice remaining. Place 1/3 of berries in 2-quart bowl and sprinkle lightly with sugar. Top with 1/3 of cake cubes. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons sherry, then pour 1/3 of custard over cake.
Continue layering until berries, cake, sherry and custard are used up. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Before serving, top with whipped cream and reserved whole berries. Sprinkle with almonds.

(C) 1992 The Los Angeles Times

Welsh Cakes (bakestone Recipes)

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

8 ounce Plain flour
1 teaspoon Baking powder
¼ teaspoon Mixed spice
2 ounce Butter or margarine
2 ounce Lard
3 ounce Granulated sugar
2 ounce Raisins (or currants)
1 Egg, beaten
3 tablespoon Milk

Preparation:

Sift the flour, baking powder and spice into a mizing bowl. Cut the fat into the flour, and rub it to a breadcrumb-like consistency; then mix in the sugar and raisins. Mix in the egg, and sufficient milk to make a stiff dough. Roll out on a floured board to ¼ inch thick. Cut into 3 inch rounds. Bake on a hot greased bakestone until golden brown, about 4 minutes on each side.
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Variation: "Teisen Dinca" -- Make up the Welsh Cake dough adding 6 oz peeled and grated cooking apples before adding the egg. Mix to a stiff dough, adding milk if necessary. Roll out, cut into rounds and cook on the bakestone as for Welsh Cakes. Serve hot with butter, golden syrup, or honey.

Yorkshire Oatcakes (from Grigson's ENGLISH FOOD)

Servings: 4 servings

Ingredients:

1 pound Fine oatmeal
½ ounce Fresh yeast
1 teaspoon Salt (scant)
Water at blood heat

Preparation:

Put the oatmeal and salt in a bowl. Cream the yeast with a teacupful of water, and leave it to rise to a creamy froth. Mix into the oatmeal and add more water until the batter is like a thick cream. A ladleful is thrown onto the heated griddle or bakestone, in a narrow strip. It immediately puffs up with steam, which makes it smooth underneath and rough on top. "When baked it is damp and flexible, and is hung on the wooden clothes rail before the fire" (if you have one!) "to dry, or on lines across the kitchen ceiling. It must be crisped quickly immediately before it is to be eaten." The flavour is slightly bitter and very appetising. "It can be used for soups, fish, fowl, cheese, butter, or any kind of meat in place of any other kind of bread or biscuit."

(Lacking lines in the kitchen, you might try hanging the cakes over a broomstick handle in front of a radiator or open fire, or just toasting them under the broiler. When we had an Aga, in the kitchen of the last house we rented, we used the "towel-drying rail" in front of the ovens for this kind of thing, as well as for drying pasta: it worked very well.)